Are You a Sandy Brown Natural?


Erika writes:
A few years ago, my hair dresser shared that people with my color hair (a dark but very sandy and shine free brown, that's very blond in the sun), have a very "unique" natural hair texture. I've observed a few other SB's like myself (sandy browns) and I see the following commonalities:

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When is a TWA No Longer a TWA?



Hola Chicas!

Many naturals, at some point in time, have rocked a TWA, which is short for “teeny weeny afro.” For most, the image of someone following the Big Chop is what comes to mind when they think about a TWA. But when is a TWA no longer a TWA?

Achieving the Perfect Bantu Knot-Out: Wet or Dry Hair?


Hola Chicas,

Bantu Knots create the most gorgeous spiral effect when you release them... it gives you results unlike any twist or braid out. It's the perfect style because everyone can try it-- transitioners looking to blend textures, divas with straight hair and naturals of most lengths.

But the question is always the same...do you get the perfect bantu knot out on wet or dry hair?

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How to Get Sleek Edges...No Gel...No Brush


Hola Chicas!

I'm re-posting the article below. After the Super Cute Headband blog, I received an influx of emails asking how I achieved my smooth edges, and this routine, unlike most, is one that has not changed (can you believe it?!). After you're done reading, leave a comment detailing how you get your edges smooth!

So yesterday evening, I was feeling like a frizz monster, and knew that I'd probably end up pulling my TnC into a pony or bun the following morning. I usually lack this foresight, as I turn into a pumpkin after 9pm, and my edges end up FUZZY...which is okay some days, but every now and then, I want a sleeker look! Here's what I did:

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This is Why Your Crown is Dryer than the Rest of Your Hair


Crown of Glory or... Thorns
by Shelli of Hairscapades

I often hear and read many naturals complaining about the hair at the crown of their head. “It’s dry, it’s brittle, it’s dull, it’s coarse, it breaks easily, it’s the kinkiest hair on my head, it’s the hardest to handle!” And, I’m no different. The hair on the left side of my crown is always shorter and more prone to damage than the rest of my hair, always seeming to exhibit breakage and straggily (yes, straggily, it’s a word! ;) ) and raggedy ends.

I’ve come to learn over the years that this is most likely due to the fact that the hair at one’s crown is usually taking the brunt of the elements, you know: sun, wind, rain, cruddy air and free radicals;). I also always just thought that this exposure simply resulted in a raised cuticle and more porous strands, whereas the hair protected by the crown hair is smoother and far more cooperative.

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How CurlyNikki Gets the Perfect Twist Out Every Time


Exhale1913 writes:

In my natural hair journey, I've learned that TECHNIQUE can be just as important as products, so therefore I pose a question regarding styling techniques (including products used) that gives the best results for the most defined Twist-Out or Twist-n-Curl.

CN Responds:
I've been playing around with this a lot lately... especially considering that Twist-Outs and Twist-n-Curls are my signature styles! My most recent experiments have resulted in the following implementations:

1. Flat Twist the Roots for a More Consistent Pattern 

I guess I don't quite mean flat twist--- take the section you wish to twist, and separate out the uppermost layer. Two strand twist that layer 5-6 times, and then grab the rest of the hair in that section and two strand twist to the ends. I hope that makes sense.
Before, when I was only securing the roots with a duck bill clip, they still managed to come undone and take on their natural texture rather than the wavy texture the twists created on my length. This has definitely changed my life :-)

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