How to Get Professional Finger Coils at Home



Finger coils are a great styling option for naturals of many lengths. In all the eight years I’ve been natural, I thought I could only rock coils at a shorter length, but that is so far from the truth! I had a chance to experience this for myself with the help of Houston stylist Candace Walls of Sovereign Styles Hair Studio. Using products from the Design Essentials Natural line, she took my hair from curls to coils in no time flat!

Products I Used: 


I’m a pretty quick learner and I really think this is a style I can do at home myself. However, never having thought I could accomplish this type of style was really the only thing holding me back.

Read More!!>>>>

Understanding Your Hair Texture: Width and Pattern


by Susan Walker of Earthtones Naturals

First things First – Hair Width

Regardless of if your hair is straight, wavy, curly or kinky we all have 3 basic widths: fine, medium and thick which can also be called coarse. Width is not how the hair feels but describes the thickness of each individual strand of hair. The comparison is typically to a piece of thread. If your hair is fine, it’s thinner than the thread, medium hair is usually the same width and thick or coarse strands are thicker than the piece of thread.

Characteristics of Each Hair Width

Fine Hair

Fine hair is the most fragile texture and can be easily damaged. Contrary to popular belief, people with finer hair tend to have more hair than people with thicker hair strands. Fine hair can tend to be oilier than other hair types. For those of you with fine hair you may find difficulty holding a style; your hair is light and can fall flat against your head. Volume is often desired but not often attained. Structurally fine hair has two hair layers – a cortex and a cuticle.

Read More!!>>>

How to Protect Your Hair While Swimming


by Nicole Hollis of Hair Liberty

Swimming is fun and relaxing whether you're doing it for exercise or just to cool off. You don't have to limit your pool time for your hair, but you do have to take some extra precautions. Chlorinated water and constant friction from swimming will take a toll on African American hair. Spend a few minutes before and after swimming to help your hair survive the summer.

Key Tips
  • Rinse your hair with tap water before you get in the pool.
  • Don't wear a swim cap if it pulls too tightly or rips out your hair at the hairline.
  • Always shampoo after you swim, chlorine does not rinse out.

Pros and Cons of Afro Puffy Twists...Would I Do it Again?



by Shelli of Hairscapades
I was originally going to call this post, “Afro Puffy Twists or How My Dream Turned into a Nightmare.” However, time has allowed wounds to heal and a level-head to prevail. Now that I’ve sufficiently recovered from my PTSD (Post Twists Stress Disorder), I feel that I can give a breakdown of the Pros and Cons of my long-term, winter protective style, Afro Puffy Twists.
Read More!!>>>

Creating Kinky Twists for Protective Styling

 
by Lisa Michelle via NaturallyCurly

I always hear about people opting to wear protective styles during the harsh winter. But what about protecting your hair during the hot summer months? With summer just around the corner, it's time to think about protective styles during the hot months ahead. I’ve worn micro braids and Senegalese twists, but never tried my hand at kinky twists. If you follow the same premise of two strand twists, kinky twists should be a fairly straight forward installation and can save you lots of money should you choose to do them yourself. Here’s how I did mine!

Read More!!>>>

Natural Hair Styles- The Graduation Edition

Re-Post 5/2/2012

by Jamila of For The Fabulous and Frugal  

It's that time again! Graduation is right around the corner, so I wanted to do a special post for you fabulous college curlies preparing to move on to the next phase of your life!

My first tip is that you can wear your curly/kinky/coily underneath your cap. I thought it wasn't possible, but it was actually quite easy to wear a cap over my curls, even with the humidity of summer in North Carolina. So before you reach for that flat iron,  here are some style options to keep it fierce and carefree on graduation day. 

Twist Out: A simple way to rock your hair big and boldly under a cap is to simply wear a twist out and secure the cap on with bobby pins, which is what I did. To maximize space under the cap, try flat twisting your hair and not fluffing the roots, so that the area underneath the cap lies flat, and the part outside of it is visible and defined.  You can also pin some of the front section of your hair back, like I did:
Twist-out with one side pinned to the back
 Not convinced? Here are some more ladies rocking fierce twist outs underneath a graduation cap:
 

Your Moisturizer Needs These 4 Ingredients to be Effective

 
by Susan Walker of Earthtones Naturals

If someone were to ask me what is the number one challenge with natural hair my answer would be maintaining appropriate moisture levels. This topic has been covered extensively but dry hair is the the number one complaint of many natural women I hear from and it warrants further discussion.

There has been a lot of confusion about what moisture actually is, how to moisturize hair and what ingredients should be included in an effective moisturizer. Products containing emollients such as mineral oil and petroleum, natural oils and butters as well as silicones have been marketed as moisturizers. Women have used these products with no relief to their dry hair. Brittleness has continued with ensuing breakage. Because of this we need to take a deeper look into this concept of moisturizing our hair, dissect the formulas and really understand what makes a product an effective moisturizer.

What is Moisture?
Moisture is a property of water and this element makes the best moisturizer. Hydration contributes to the pliability and elasticity of the hair. Because water can quickly enter and exit the hair it’s difficult for it to remain moisturized for long periods of time with just water. Factor in conditions such as high porosity and chemical damage and keeping the hair hydrated seems as though it’s a losing battle. This is where an effective moisturizer is crucial.

Read On>>>

Little Boys and Natural Hair



by Monica Lake

There are a ton of blogs and Youtube channels devoted to girls and their curls- -how to style them, dress them up, keep them healthy etc. There is almost no information online devoted to young boys with highly textured hair. What about those of us with little princes who don’t want to chuck up the deuces to that beautiful hair and “just get a fade”? Every blue moon I may see a little boy with locs or cornrows, but almost never free flowing a la Jaden Smith. It's frowned upon to have your son rock his curls after learning how to talk, as the old wives tale goes.

Read More!!>>>

The Best Way to Deep Condition for Maximum Moisture - Part II



Part 2: The Ingredients and the Methods

by Susan Walker of Earthtone Naturals

How do you know if your deep conditioner is good or not? Do you rely on price? Not necessarily as an expensive product doesn’t mean the product is good, nor does a cheap product mean it doesn’t work. So what should you look for? The answer to this question is to become ingredient savvy. Having an understanding of ingredients will help you determine, at least at first glance, if a deep conditioner is going to be effective for you or not.

Look for ingredients that attach onto to the hair

Remember we discussed the fact that conditioning agents ADSORB to the hair? ADSORBING means that the ingredients attach to the surface of the hair. This phenomenon is responsible for helping to soften the hair, temporarily repair the hair, smooth the cuticle and reduce flyways.

The main types of ingredients you’re looking for are cationic surfactants, cationic polymers, emollients, oils and silicones.

Read More!!>>>

The Best Way to Deep Condition for Maximum Moisture


by Susan Walker of Earthtone Naturals

Deep conditioning is an extremely important practice for many naturals and as a result there are various ways women deep condition their hair. But what is the proper way to deep condition the hair? Why are some methods more important than others and what is a complete waste of time. The purpose of this article is to sift through all of the information to give the real truth about this process, and how to get the results your looking for.

Why Deep Condition?
What you’re trying to accomplish with conditioning is to restore or maintain the elasticity of the hair so that it’s better able to withstand combing, brushing, cleansing etc. without too much damage. Conditioning can also improve the appearance of the hair causing it to appear healthy.  Conditioning in general should accomplish the following:
  • Ease combing (both wet and dry)
  • Increase softness to the hair
  • Minimize flyaways
  • Reduce the porosity of the hair
  • Improve the manageability of the hair

Transitioning Hairstyles For Black Women


originally posted on Treasured Locks

Transitioning from permed or relaxed hair to natural hair should be an exciting time for you. It should not be a time of intimidation or of a feeling of loss. Many women face objections from boyfriends, husbands, family and even in the workplace. While we can't help you with those social and political pressures, we can give you some tips on what to expect and how to make the transition as easy as possible.

How Not to Make the Transition to Natural Hair

Transitioning to natural hair in other ways, like pressing the natural hair as it grows in underneath the relaxed hair, are going to make your hair prone to breakage and can damage the natural hair you're trying to grow in. Products that claim to revert permed hair might make it frizzy, but are not going to really make it natural. You do not want to put chemicals on top of chemicals in your hair. You will only end up damaging the hair and get even more breakage than you would experience otherwise. While transitioning, try to find a style that will accommodate the new growth coming in like twists or braids.

Finding a Natural Hair Transition Style

This may be the biggest challenge of all about going natural (besides the comments from your friend and co-workers). How do you style your hair when it's very short or when some of it is nappy and the rest is straight. There are several options. Here are a few:

Read More!!!>>>>>

How to Rope Twist: Natural Hair Basics


by NaturallyChelsea via NaturallyCurly

I bet you didn’t know that, besides the regular method of twisting, there is another way to twist your hair called rope twisting. It’s really simple and easy, yet so much better than simply regularly twisting your coils. If you haven’t already been clued in on this method, here’s a simple how-to that will have you rope twisting like a pro in no time.

Read More!!>>>>

Are You Down With Co-Washing?


By Dr. Phoenyx Austin of DrPhoenyx.com

Hey ladies! One of the best hair practices I adopted after going natural was co-washing. I was actually years into natural hair and cleansing my hair with sulfate-free shampoos. I knew all about the harsh sulfates thing, but I had no clue that there was something even better than shampoo. Then one day, a fellow naturalista put me onto co-washing. And boy oh boy did this doc fall in love! If you aren’t hip to the co-washing game, I’ll give you a quick debriefing of what it is, why you should do it, how often you should do it, and what types of conditioners to use.

Read More!!>>>

This is Why Your Crown is Dryer than the Rest of Your Hair


Crown of Glory or... Thorns
by Shelli of Hairscapades

I often hear and read many naturals complaining about the hair at the crown of their head. “It’s dry, it’s brittle, it’s dull, it’s coarse, it breaks easily, it’s the kinkiest hair on my head, it’s the hardest to handle!” And, I’m no different. The hair on the left side of my crown is always shorter and more prone to damage than the rest of my hair, always seeming to exhibit breakage and straggily (yes, straggily, it’s a word! ;) ) and raggedy ends.

I’ve come to learn over the years that this is most likely due to the fact that the hair at one’s crown is usually taking the brunt of the elements, you know: sun, wind, rain, cruddy air and free radicals;). I also always just thought that this exposure simply resulted in a raised cuticle and more porous strands, whereas the hair protected by the crown hair is smoother and far more cooperative.

Read More!!>>>>

Is It Really Bad to Grease Your Scalp?



by Nicole Hollis of Hair Liberty

If you grew up in a traditional African American household, a jar of hair grease was never too far away. Oiling the scalp with thick grease was thought to be a staple of any good hair care regimen. Today, experts advise against oiling the scalp, but many African American women still believe that hair grease is a part of obtaining healthy hair. But is it really helpful? Or can it cause more damage than good?

Read More!>>>

3 Easy Ways to Maintain Your Twist-Outs at Night




Tiffany writes:
"I did some small twists and wore those for a few days and now I have the best twist out I've ever had. But I can never seem to keep the results for more than a day, and I REFUSE to put all those twists back in every night. Anybody have any suggestions on how to maintain the definition overnight? I usually just put my bonnet on and pray for the best in the morning!"
Read More!>>>

Why You Need Oils in Your Conditioner


 by Susan Walker of Earthtones Naturals

Conditioners formulated for textured hair will typically contain emollients and oils in a fairly high amount. This is because curly and coily hair tends to be drier than other hair types. Now when it comes to conditioners, there are so many types available, and each one has its specific attributes and benefits to the hair. For the purpose of this discussion I’ll refer to moisturizing conditioners since this is the type of conditioner most curlies will be using.

Moisturizing conditioners typically increase the moisture content of the hair, improve elasticity and manageability. They work to add and retain moisture in the hair. Now when we talk about your hair needing extra moisture that doesn’t mean oil. Hydration is a main characteristic of water so increasing water really means replenishing water to the hair, and preventing or minimizing it’s escape into the surrounding environment. So anything that is going to help improve water retention in the hair is ideal for dry textured hair. There are many ingredients that will help and emollients and oils are among them. Additionally, using oils in conditioners can help nourish the scalp.

Read On>>>

The 3 Step Program to Repairing Damaged Natural Hair


source

The 3R™ Damaged Hair Restoration System

By Susan Walker, Founder & Creative Director of Earthtones Naturals 

If your hair has extensive damage then you’ll definitely want to implement some effective strategies to improve its health. Since there is no way to really permanently repair damaged areas, preventing further damage and addressing existing issues will enhance the look and condition of your hair. I’ve developed a simple 3-step program to successfully accomplish this.

1. Remove
This goes without saying. If what you’re doing right now is contributing negatively to the state of your hair then either stop or reduce the frequency with which you are doing it. If you’re wearing your hair in tight ponytails as your go-to style and your hairline is non-existent as a result then you’ll need to find another style. If you’re cleansing your hair with a shampoo that contains harsh sulfates then you’ll need to improve your choice of cleansers. Examine any physical manipulation or chemical processing that is part of your hair care regimen that is contributing to increased damage.

Read More!>>>

The Key to Finding the Perfect Leave In? Shop by Hair Width




by Nicole Harmon author of Coils & Curls: The Hair Product Handbook

It takes just the right blend of water (for moisture) and emollients (for smoothing) to tame coils and curls. The emollients are the tricky part. Too heavy and they’ll weigh your hair down, too light and you’ll end up with frizz.

To find the right leave-ins for your hair, it’s important that you understand your “strand thickness," otherwise known as "hair width", which can be categorized as “fine to medium” or “medium to thick”. When you see those words on a product label, they’re not referring to how much hair you have; they’re describing the thickness of each individual strand on your head.

Read More!>>>

Can I Use a Rinse-Out Conditioner as a Leave-in?


Dark Eyes asks…Is it ok to use a regular conditioner as a leave in conditioner? I have long, thick wavy hair that needs to be weighed down. Any recommendations or ingredients to look for?

The Left Brain responds:
Rinse off and leave-on products are formulated differently for a reason. Almost any oily material will provide conditioning when left on the hair. But a special kind of ingredient is required to ensure that conditioning agents will “stick” to hair during rinsing.

Read More!>>>

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...