Top 10 Ingredients that Stimulate Hair Growth



When there are issues with getting your hair to grow, it’s important to rectify the situation both internally and externally. A number of factors contribute to reduced hair growth, from your scalp being too dirty or your pores being blocked from build-up.

It is true that nothing but time can make your hair grow, but there may be ways to help stimulate hair growth. Check out these options to give your curls extra encouragement.

1. Peppermint Oil
With a fresh aroma, this strongly concentrated oil must be diluted before applying the scalp. It penetrates the scalp and stimulates the hair follicle, allowing for more oxygen production that gives your curls the green light to grow.

Tip:
Apply it directly to the scalp with a gentle massage and cover for 20 to 30 minutes.
Check out this DIY Peppermint Pre-Poo recipe to help stimulate blood circulation to your scalp.

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How to Read Natural Hair Product Labels

IG @tolaniav

by Charlene Walton of TexturedTalk.com

Paraben free. Sulfate free. Silicone free. Yes, we’ve all seen these words plastered across a lot of products but what does this stuff really mean? What’s really inside natural hair products and how does it affect your hair? Often, we gravitate to what sounds great on the front of a label. But the proof is in the pudding aka the ingredients. Brands are required to list the scientific name of ingredients on the labels, therefore; you may think an ingredient is harmful simply because you can not pronounce the word. I’m here to tell you that’s simply not true. Here’s how to understand the ingredients in natural hair products the next time you’re about to spend your coins on the latest product or if you’re shopping with us at texturesnaturalhaircare.com of course!

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Can too much protein really cause dry, breaking hair?

IG @blasiandoll11


Q: Hello, I’ve heard that too much protein can be bad for hair and cause it to become dry and eventually break off. I have a conditioner called Abba gentle conditioner that has protein but when I use it my hair looks and feels great. So is there any truth to this?

TheBeautyBrains Responds: 
This notion that too much protein is bad for your hair comes up quite often. I’ve even heard the concern raised that you can have “protein sensitive hair.” But when you look at the science there’s no mechanism for topically applied protein causing hair to break. So what’s going on here?

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Amla: Miracle Oil or Too Good to Be True?!



Where Does it Come From? 
Among the many botanical based ingredients currently popular in hair care routines, amla is perhaps the one that seems the most mysterious, at least from a chemistry point of view.

Amla is derived from the fruit of the Indian gooseberry or Phyllanthus emblica L., a deciduous tree found in both the tropical and subtropical portions of the Indian and Southeastern Asian countries.
The lemon-sized fruit is greenish yellow with attractive vertical striations and has a bitter, sour, and sweet taste. While amla fruit is primarily composed of water, it also contains a variety of sugars, carbohydrates, protein, fiber, minerals, and contains very high amounts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C). For many centuries it has been prized by practitioners of Ayurvedic medicine as well as many other groups for its reportedly amazing medicinal attributes as well as for its beneficial properties for hair and skin.

What Does it Do? 
Advocates who support topical use of amla for hair claim that it is has many uses:
  • cleansing agent
  • deep conditioning treatment
  • dandruff remedy
  • prevents graying of hair
  • darkens hair without use of dyes
  • imparts shine
  • improves hair growth
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Understanding Your Hair Texture: Width and Pattern


by Susan Walker of Earthtones Naturals

First things First – Hair Width

Regardless of if your hair is straight, wavy, curly or kinky we all have 3 basic widths: fine, medium and thick which can also be called coarse. Width is not how the hair feels but describes the thickness of each individual strand of hair. The comparison is typically to a piece of thread. If your hair is fine, it’s thinner than the thread, medium hair is usually the same width and thick or coarse strands are thicker than the piece of thread.

Characteristics of Each Hair Width

Fine Hair

Fine hair is the most fragile texture and can be easily damaged. Contrary to popular belief, people with finer hair tend to have more hair than people with thicker hair strands. Fine hair can tend to be oilier than other hair types. For those of you with fine hair you may find difficulty holding a style; your hair is light and can fall flat against your head. Volume is often desired but not often attained. Structurally fine hair has two hair layers – a cortex and a cuticle.

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#TeamEdges : How to Treat and Prevent Thin Edges



Any woman can experience thinning, breaking, or balding edges. It’s not just women who are relaxed, wear weave, or are older. There are numerous reasons why your hairline can thin. Hair loss is not confined to men; women actually make up 40% of Americans suffering from hair loss, according to American Hair Loss. Thinning edges can be upsetting and embarrassing, and many of us are haunted by pictures of super models with bare edges. So it is no wonder so many women are desperate for answers.

The Causes of Thinning Edges
Prevention attributes the main causes of hair loss to pregnancy, postpartum, drastic weight loss, stress, hereditary, hypothyroidism, chronic illnesses like lupus, iron deficiency anemia, hormone imbalances like polycystic ovarian syndrome, scalp conditions like seborrheic dermatitis, alopecia areata, and excessive styling.

Many women, whether natural or relaxed, are experiencing thinning edges due to excessive styling and/or bad styling habits. First off, do not feel like you are alone. This can happen to anyone and may happen regardless of doing everything right. Sometimes we see the problem occurring before it gets too bad and we curtail whatever the problem is.

What’s the best plant based moisturizer for hair and skin?

IG @kentekinks 

CN Says: 
Although this article focuses on skin care, we use these same ingredients in our hair! I hope it helps! Spoiler alert- shea butter, rice bran and olive oil are the winners ;) 


Q:  Rebecca asks us to recommend the most effective, longest lasting, all around best plant-based moisturizer for skin. In our response we talk about the different methods of moisturization and what it means to be “plant-based.”

A: 3 methods of moisturization.

1. Occlusives
Purpose: To reduce how much water evaporates through your skin. (Cosmetic scientists refer to this as TransEpidermal Moisture Loss or TEWL.) Occlusive agents form a hydrophobic barrier on your skin that keeps the water on the inside. The most effective examples include petrolatum, mineral oil, and dimethicone. Some plant oils help occlude the skin but typically they are included more for their emolliency.

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Healthier Natural Hair By Skipping Shampoo? (The Science.)

IG @ab.k_

Question: Is No Poo a good way to clean hair?

Allie asks…What’s the deal with this “no poo” craze? Does the hair get more healthy because of the natural oils you use? I’ve seen on Pinterest people talking about using baking soda as a cleanser and apple cider vinegar as a conditioner.

To answer Allie’s question we review several alternate ways to wash your hair.

The Ultimate No Poo
This means you don’t clean your hair AT ALL. Not even rinse it with water.

Does it work? Sure. You don’t actually have to shampoo your hair. Of course, it won’t be clean either. It will be less damaged and probably look more shiny. However, it may also look and feel greasy, smell funny, and be difficult to style in any way except laying flat on your head.

Shampoo free poo
This is rinsing your hair with water.

Does it work? It will certainly refresh your hair but it won’t remove heavy styling residue. (And, as we’ll explain, you’re still damaging your hair even without the shampoo.)

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6 Foods for Growing Long, Healthy, Natural Hair

IG @chamstyle

by Vineetha Reddy

Caring for your hair involves more than just protecting it from dust and pollution, and using external applicants to nourish it. The biggest factor that determines the quality of your hair is what you consume. For your hair to be nourished from the inside, you need to eat foods rich in certain vitamins and minerals that are essential for hair health. Here is a list of fruits and vegetables that provide your curls with the nutrients they need to be healthy and gorgeous.

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Use THIS to Rinse Frizz Away! #EasyButton

IG @nicoleelise 

by Emilia Obiekea of Adorebotanicals.com

Frizz can be caused by many factors such as humectant heavy leave-in products and using items that are very alkaline. This causes the cuticle layer to open and swell. Tired of the hot and humid weather causing your wash n go's, twist outs and braid outs to look tragic by midday? A simple solution to this common problem is carbonated water.

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Does Clay Washing Actually Clean Hair?



Joneen asks:
I have a question about rhassoul clay. I’ve heard great things about using it as a shampoo. My concern, though, is mineral buildup. This is one of the results of hard water that has a negative impact on hair, and something I am currently experiencing and want to avoid in the future. I know rhassoul is largely silica and aluminum, but it does have some calcium and magnesium in it, the very same minerals that hard water contains that are so problematic.

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Is It Safe to Melt Coconut Oil in the Microwave? #GeekOut



Lindsay Girl asks: I have used extra virgin coconut oil in my hair as a deep conditioning treatment once a week for several years now. I melt the oil in the microwave. This morning I was reading in an article on the naturallycurly.com website that the author of the article “heard” that you shouldn’t warm coconut oil in the microwave because that will “alter the bonds” in the oil. What say the Brains? Can I safely put the coconut oil in the microwave to melt it? Or is there a better way?

The Beauty Brains responds:
When LG raised this question in our Forum we said “no problem.” But after further consideration we realized that there is some risk involved with heating coconut oil in a microwave oven.

The danger of microwaving coconut oil

Coconut oil penetrates hair because of its size and the configuration of its carbon chain. Unless you’re heating it above the point where it will decompose, microwaving it should cause no problems. In other words, “melting” it is just fine. BUT you need to be very careful when using this approach. Here’s why:

7 Reasons Why Your Natural Hair is Breaking.

IG @Joyjah

by Charlene Walton of TexturedTalk.com

You would be amazed at the many things that can cause breakage on natural hair. There are several things we do daily, which may not seem like a bad idea but can actually do more harm than good. I guarantee it, if you stay away from these 7 deadly sins then you will be A-ok! Let’s begin!

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The 'Water Only Washing' Method for Softer, Healthier Natural Hair?

IG @art.by.lex

by Jonna of BlackNaps.org

The Water Only Washing method isn’t a new concept, but it started to gain notoriety on natural hair forums around 2013, and the premise is that our naturally occurring sebum is all the product we need. By eliminating all other products from your regimen, including natural oils and butters, you can simply use water to move the sebum down the hair shaft and eventually coat the hair completely. Once the hair is completely coated with sebum from your scalp, your hair is said to be soft and moisturized, easy to detangle, and your natural curls will pop.

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Why Does My Natural Hair Always Look So Dry?


by Sabrina Perkins of SeriouslyNatural.org

When it comes to maintaining moisture in your hair, sheen is one of the main characteristics you are told to look out for but what if your hair doesn’t have “sheen?” The reason being is straight hair reflects light, while highly textured hair with its curls and and bends actually refracts light, giving it a dull appearance.

There is a difference between our hair's natural less-than-sheeny look and being dry. Yes, it is possible for your hair to be lacking luster, but it doesn’t always mean that the hair is dry or lacking moisture. There are many reasons as to why some natural hair seems to look more dry than others, but here are 3 main reasons why your natural hair is lacking luster:

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What is MSM? Can it Help My Natural Hair Growth?




It’s always a pleasant surprise when you stumble upon a vitamin or supplement that can cure some of the most common health issues, while also giving you a nice little beauty boost. And such is the case for MSM!

I was recently chatting with a newly natural neighbor (try saying that 3 times fast!), when she asked about supplements she could take for hair growth. I suggested MSM. I guess she expected me say something like biotin or a multivitamin, because she instantly looked confused. So I explained that MSM, aka methylsulfonylmethane, is a sulfur-based compound that is naturally found in many foods such as milk, onions, garlic and green vegetables. Next to water and salt, MSM is also the 3rd largest compound found in the human body. Within the medical community, MSM has been traditionally used to treat pain bone and joint diseases such as osteoarthritis and tendonitis. But it also has a really cool side effect. And this really cool “side effect” is hair growth.

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How To Heal Your Damaged Hair In The Kitchen


IG: Carruthbeauty

by Tiffani Greenaway of MyMommyVents.com

Nothing ruins a fab twist out faster than split ends.

If your hair is dry, brittle, and breaking, you've probably got damage. Over styling, bi-weekly blowouts, and a number of other factors can wreak havoc on our strands. From rocking too tight braids to using too much heat, damage shows itself in split ends and dull, dry hair.

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The Secret Ingredient That Works Magic for Naturally Curly Hair

IG @mynaturalsistas

by Nicole via TexturedTalk.com

Attention curly girls: Major key alert!! Are you looking for the cure for dull, lifeless curly hair? How about something to help combat that dry itchy scalp? Long hair, don’t care? I know something that can help promote hair growth too! Curlfriends, I introduce to you……………..Aloe Vera! Yes, aloe vera! This prickly plant is jammed packed with so many vitamins and nutrients! This is the secret ingredient that will work magic on your hair and the benefits of aloe vera for natural hair are endless. Here are some of the ways that aloe vera can help your strands:

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Should You Be Using Tea Tree Oil for Your Natural Hair?




Uses of tea tree oil
A renewed interest in natural substances has increased the availability of tea tree oil as a home remedy, and has also inspired research into its composition and beneficial properties. While it should never be taken internally due to potential toxicity, it is fantastic for topical treatment at home of:
  • dandruff
  • hair growth
  • acne
  • ingrown hair
  • superficial wounds
  • bug bites
  • thrush
  • athlete’s foot
  • fever blisters

Should I Really Use Grease on My Natural Hair?

By: Hair Liberty's Nicole Hollis

Q: Should I really use grease on my hair?


A: Grease is usually a combination of petroleum (cleaned up sludge from the earth) and mineral oil (even cleaner, liquefied sludge from the earth). Petroleum-based products come from the same Earth that we pollute everyday with factory run off, pharmaceuticals, household chemicals, etc. Questions about the safety of mineral oil and petroleum in cosmetic products come from concern that they may not be clean enough after coming from such a dirty place. The petroleum and mineral oil used in medicinal creams (Neosporin, for example) gets cleaned much more thoroughly than the stuff used in hair products.

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