Top Curly Kids Hairstyles for Back to School


by Mary Wolff
Back to school is an exciting time for the entire family. The kids are excited for another year with new adventures, and most parents are just happy to get back into a normal routine. When it comes to getting back on that routine, hammering down a few of the top curly kids hairstyles for back to school will make things a little easier. Here are a few that are perfect for a new year of learning!

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Going Natural May NOT Be the Key to Helping Your Daughter Embrace Her Natural Hair


by Kirleen Neely PhD, LPC-S of http://www.richardsoncounseling.com/ 

In recent years natural hair moms have begun to unapologetically enter PTA meetings, playgrounds, and mommy groups rocking their curls. Many of them made a conscious decision to “go natural” as a way to teach their daughters self-acceptance and also help them learn how to navigate their kinky coils.

One significant off spring of their choice to “go natural” is for the first time in decades many little Black girls have grown up knowing that wearing their hair natural is an option. They have gone to weddings where the bride strolls down the aisle with kinky curls, had teachers who proudly rock a fierce twist out, and seen their moms do the big chop. Undoubtedly, in the last decade little girls have been exposed to a higher percentage of diverse hair images than in years prior.

Curly Kids: The Basic Guide to Natural Hair Care for Children

 
by Bee of 83toinfinity.com
Do you have memories of sitting in between your mother’s legs while she parted your hair, oiled your scalp, and styled you up in some plaits and twists, perhaps with pretty clips and bubbles and elastics? Are those memories fond or fearful? For me, they’re all warm and fuzzy. Having my mom wash and braid me up for school was usually something I looked forward to – her hands were gentle, I loved the smell of the African Pride scalp oils she used (remember the yellow ones filled with petroleum and “herbs”?), and we had fun watching TV or talking while she got me ready for the next day of school.

I know that for others, the memories aren’t so sweet. Hair being scraped back and torn with rough combing, singes from irons used to “tame” naps, and harsh comments about how tough, nappy, and bad one’s hair was. I’ve seen the after-effects of negative treatment pass down much more visibly than the positive – mothers who were told their hair was “bad” have practiced the same with their own children, especially their daughters. Seeing 4 year olds with relaxed hair makes me sad. Hearing mothers talk about how terrible their child’s hair is in front of the child makes me cringe.

I have heard Black women admit to choosing fathers of another race in order to ensure that her daughter didn’t have “nappy-ass hair” like she did. I’ve spoken with White mothers who have children with Black men, but have absolutely no clue what to do with their baby’s hair.

Read More!!>>>>

On Changing Generational Perceptions of Natural Hair

CN says- that's my Boogie rockin' two-strands!

by Keora Bernard

About a year ago, I experienced naturalism in a profound way. I was confronted with the recycled mentalities that still exist among households of color about having coarser textured natural strands. Instead of doing my own hair, I decided that I would let my next door neighbor do my hair. Like many naturals, doing our hair is a laborious process and we relish the idea of having our scalps massaged and letting another person work through our dense terrain of curls, kinks, and coils.

Additionally, my girlfriend who is Latina, also decided to get her hair done by my next door neighbor. My girlfriend wanted bangs to be cut and her hair to be curled. On the other hand, I opted for a braided hairstyle, choosing to continue with my weekly protective styling routine. At the household, there were two younger girls who watched my girlfriend and me in awe.

Read On!>>>

Tips for Transitioning Little Girls to Natural Hair


By Shaunic of BrownGirlsHair.com

My daughter has never had a perm, but I did! I had a perm for more than 20 years before I decided to transition my hair to natural in 2009. (My daughter’s hair inspired me to transition to natural.) I knew that if I could be patient and figure out how to manage her natural hair, I could certainly do the same with mine.

If you gave your little girl a perm and now regret it, or you've transitioned like me and want to do the same with your daughter, or whatever your situation maybe, I am going to share my transitioning tips and suggestions with you.

Read On>>>

How to Cornrow- Natural Hair Styles


Nadine of GirlsLoveYourCurls writes:

This braid tutorial is for those who would love to broaden their repertoire of protective styles, using more complicated braiding techniques, but don't know how to braid. The cost of getting braids done professionally can be very expensive, so doing it yourself might be the way to go. If you've watched a handful of tutorials, but are still at a loss, this technique of using colored yarn as a visual, might just help it click!

Watch Now!>>>

Washing Newborn, Infants and Toddlers Natural Hair



I've had sooo many requests for tutorial on baby hair care, so I've finally put one together and it's already having an amazing response. I thought the Curly Nikki massive might appreciate it too:).

Princess Hair.


Jessica writes:

 I'd like to share an essay that I performed in a show called "Listen to Your Mother." The piece is called "princess hair" and it was inspired by my now four-year old who told me she "didn't like her hair" because it wasn't like the princesses she saw on TV. It's an inspirational story of self-love and of acceptance.

5 Story Books for Little Brown Girls with Natural Hair



I’m inspired to share these books after a recent encounter with a mom; she told me her four-year-old little girl, who has gorgeous, kinky-curly golden coils, was starting to notice and questioning the difference between her hair and other little girls. It was at that moment I remembered all of my insecurities while growing up in a Hispanic neighborhood, where best friend had silky, bone-straight hair which easily grazed her tailbone. The difference for little girls now is the plethora of positive reinforcers to encourage them to be just who they are — beautifully kinky-curly.

Lola has really really REALLY big hair, much bigger than the other kids at her school, but that doesn’t stop her from telling anyone who will listen just how much she LOVES her hair! It´s not always easy being a kid. Designed to boost self-esteem and build confidence, this beautifully illustrated picture book is aimed at boys and girls who may need a reminder from time to time that it’s okay to look different from the other kids at their school.

Teach Your Daughter to Care for Her Natural Hair



By Shaunic of Brown Girls Hair


Every little girl loves to play in Mommy's clothes, shoes, and jewelry. She loves to watch Mom put on her make up and comb her hair. She's looking at you dreaming of the day when she will be able to do it too!

We all know that our children learn best by watching what we do, not what we say. The first step to teaching your daughter how to care for her hair is to establish good hair habits with your hair first. She's always watching you, even when you aren't paying attention.

Read On!>>>

"In Nigeria, Queens of Africa steal a march on Barbie"


via Angela Ukomadu and Tim Cocks of Yahoo.com

LAGOS (Reuters) - With a booming economy in Nigeria and more black children than anywhere else in the world, Taofick Okoya was dismayed some years ago when he couldn't find a black doll for his niece.

Read On!>>>

Charlize Glass - Natural Hair Tutorial feat. Autumn Miller (Natural Curly Hair)

Queen shares-

This little girl is awesome! She's a dancer who's been in videos and recently got a shout-out from Beyonce for a video she posted on IG dancing to 'Yonce'. The hair tutorial is the sweetest thing ever! I think the CurlyNikki community with love her!

On Her LaLaLoopsy- Gia's Curlformer Adventures


I've used Curlformers on and off for the last 3 years, relying on them heavily in the cooler months when I'm protective styling to give me smoother, longer lasting up-dos.  I've learned that you get #WayMoreDoper results with soaking wet hair, small sections (dries faster and sets smoother) and less product. Also, the slippier the leave-in, the better. At any rate, as GiaDiva is my hair twin, I couldn't wait to see how they'd treat her!

Read On>>>

Tips for Fathers: Curly Kids and Hair Care


by Alicia James of MsAliciaJames.com

So, I know I am totally a day late, but in celebration of all the wonderful men who provide for, inspire, and teach our children, I wanted to do something that may help you and him just in case. I've had to travel quite a few times, leaving hair duty up to my husband. There are also those times when Mommy is just not feeling well. So I've taught him a few tricks that he has been open to learning even though it terrifies him.

Read More for Tips!>>>

Curly Baby Growth Stages



Babies , kids and curls… Looking back at some of those baby photos, you may notice that your curls, coils or waves looked a little different than they do now. Over the years your hair may have gone through some more drastic changes, especially when you were a younger child.

Naturally curly hair is determined genetically. Some genes are said to be dominant over others; this means that, when an individual inherits two different genes for the same trait, one is more likely to express itself rather than the other. The gene for curly hair is said to have incomplete dominance over that for straight, so an individual inheriting one straight and one curly gene may have intermediate, wavy hair.

Read More>>>

Toddlers Need A Regimen Too!


by Tammy Goodson of Curlychics

Just as it is important to create and maintain a regimen for yourself, it is equally as important to have one for your little one. Wearing multiple hats throughout the day, it can be somewhat of a balancing act trying to fit it all in. The way I handle my toddler’s hair may be a little unconventional for a few reasons but this is what works for me. For one, my son has long hair and I am not ready or willing to cut it and for two, it’s typically a 3 day process. In a nutshell, day 1 I remove his braids, day 2 I shampoo/condition and day 3 I lightly blow it out and rebraid.


Here’s the breakdown:

The Process – Day 1

Braid removal - This usually takes about 30 minutes.

Day 2
• Prior to shampooing, apply olive oil to soften and separate in 4 sections.
• Shampoo/Condition with Johnson’s Natural 3-in-1 Shampoo/Conditioner/BodyWash. (in sections)
• Continue with his bath and adjourn to the sitting room with cartoons and a healthy snack (this is crucial!)
• Apply Kinky Curly Knot Today Leave In/Detangler and styling cream of choice. (most of the time I skip the styling cream and simply use coconut oil)
• Separate hair in 10 sections (5 on each side) and braid while wet. This helps with control and stretching. (Stretching on his hair is not for length, but more so for ease of styling the next day.)
By this time, we are both ready for bed! This usually takes about 2 hours. Give or take a minute or two or twenty because you have to factor in keeping him entertained while this is all going down.

Day 3
Remove the 10 braids and blow out each section on the cool setting. Again, this is for ease of styling and sometimes I omit this step, depending on how damp his hair is from the previous day. It is much easier to detangle and part for the braiding process when it is stretched. His hair is extremely coily and thick and there is a lot of it! Whatever I can do to make the process shorter and smoother for both of us (he’s only 3), I do it.

I repeat this process every 2 weeks. #naturalkidsrock

How do you care for your toddler’s hair?


Sharing hairstories and life experiences from a curl’s perspective. Find Tammy at her blog, Curlychics, on Twitter, and Facebook.

How Do I Take Care of My Daughter's Hair?


Hola Chicas,

It's Thursday which means we've officially taken over Essence for the day!

¡Viva la RevoluciĆ³n!

Check out my latest installment, where I give a mother tips on how to care for her kiddo's hair by sharing Boogie's regimen! Head over there, check it out, 'like it', share it and comment! Also, leave questions of your own for the next article!

Thanks divas!

Later Gators,
Nik

Natural Hair Updo: Twisted Cinnabuns w/ Cornrows


We have been loving updo's over here lately! Can you tell?  Miss A will be attending her Aunt's work event this weekend so I decided to give her a style to fit the occasion. This style is perfect for both little and big girls. Great for holidays, formal events or just to feel like a princess! 

As always, I washed, detangled, moisturized (with Bee Mine Luscious Moisturizer) and banded Miss A's hair. For full washing instructions click here.

I removed the bands once her hair was almost dry, just slightly damp. I began by parting the hair from ear to ear and tying the top section off. I started working on the back section at the nape of the neck, cornrowing from the right into the middle and from the left into the middle until I was done with the back. I used Bee Mine Curly Butter on each cornrow. 

Once I got to the top I parted a fairly large section in the middle and tied it off. I added a few cornrows to the side sections going up into the middle of her head. Once those cornrows were complete I gathered a large section of hair in the front, tied it off with a ponytail holder and did a loose two strand twist. Once the twist was in I began to create the cinnabun. I simply wrapped the twist around the ponytail holder, making sure it laid flat the entire time. Once the twist was wrapped around into a cinnabun, I placed 1 or 2 bobbypins flat, straight through the cinnabun. I continued this process until she had 5 twisted cinnabuns. I added some cute flower clips I bought from Claire's and there you have it, a beautiful natural updo!

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Similar styles:


Cinnabuns & Flat twists
Cornrows & Cinnabuns

Good Hair and 'The Talk'


 
by Asmarett Ashford of LivingNaturallyEverAfter

Let me start off by telling you all that I am not an authority figure on hair nor do I claim to be the best parent in the world. Now that I put my disclaimer out there, let me introduce myself. My name is Asmarett Ashford and I am the founder of Living Naturally Ever After. I am a married mother of two who lives outside of Atlanta, Georgia. I work full time as a school counselor in a rural school system outside of Atlanta. This is my first attempt at blogging so please be kind.

The Talk.

My daughter went to a well known and highly sought after private school in Atlanta, Georgia from the time she was 3 years old until she reached the 2nd grade. This school is known in the African American community in Atlanta as “the school”. Many prestigious and affluent families send their children to this school. My whole family loved the experience and did not have a singe issue until my daughter was in kindergarten.

My daughter and I both dislike having our hair washed, combed and styled. We both watched the Jetson’s and longed for the convenience that Jane use to have (push a style, sit under the dryer for 1-2 minutes then bam your hair is clean and styled). On this particular Sunday afternoon I was extremely tired and not interested in fighting with my 5 year old daughter’s hair. She saw her freshly washed hair in the mirror and asked if she could wear it loose with a headband. “Sure” was my reply because it was less work and she looked absolutely adorable with an afro. So on Monday morning we picked out her hair which looked like wild cotton candy. She was uber excited to wear her “cotton candy” hair to school with her headband that matched her uniform. I kissed her goodbye and my husband took my daughter to school.

Later that evening I picked my daughter up from school and she was in tears and her hair was in a wild ponytail. She wouldn’t explain to me why she was crying she just asked to go home. Needless to say that was not going to fly with me. I immediately asked her teacher what happened. To my dismay the teacher replied “she has been upset all day because you forgot to comb her hair”. The teacher then went on to ask me to make sure I don’t send her back to school without her hair “done” because it caused too much of a distraction in her class. I was very shocked and honestly did not know what to say. Just then another parent walked up to me and said “I hate when I am out of town and my husband has to do my daughters hair because they make a mess”. I suppose that the other parent had good intentions and she was trying to comfort me. Both the teacher and that parent were shocked when I told them that her hair was intentionally wild because my daughter and I liked her “cotton candy” afro.

My daughter and I left the school in an awful mood. As soon as we drove away from the school my daughter stated that she never wants to wear her hair down anymore because she did not have “good hair”! She immediately began to cry and asked why her hair grew “this way” moving her hands vertically and not “that way” moving her hands down her back vertically. My heart broke for my daughter and we had to have a talk on the 30 minute ride home about her hair.

My daughter went on to state that she liked her hair when she left home but when she arrived at school her classmates immediately began to laugh at her hair. The other 5 and 6 year old children told her that her hair was “ugly, not combed and nappy”. One little girl went as far as to tell my daughter that she did not have “good hair” like her so she couldn’t wear it down. My daughter then stated that she hated her hair and wanted good hair like __ (insert random female child’s name here). I asked my daughter what “good hair” was and what it looked like. She stopped and thought for a minute then said “good hair is long and goes down here” pointing to the lower portion of her back. “Good hair is curly when it is wet and dry and it swings when you turn your head”.

I decided to stop on the way home and get my daughter some ice cream so that we could sit down and have “the talk” face to face. So over two sugar cones my daughter and I had a very difficult conversation about self-esteem and hair. I tried to explain to my 5 year old daughter that God and her parents gave her the hair that she is suppose to have. I explained that there is no such thing as “good hair” just like there is no such thing as “bad hair”. She then asked me if we could “call God and ask him to make my hair grow long down her back “. I asked her why it was so important to have long hair. She explained that the little girl in her class with long hair that reaches the bottom of her back always get picked first by the teacher and their classmates. The little girl with the long hair always has cool hair bows and all of the girls play in her hair at recess. The little girl with the long hair is always called pretty and all of the parents tell her how pretty her “good hair “is.

I was very shocked at how consumed my daughter was with her hair, her classmate’s hair and other people’sresponses to her classmate. My daughter is a beautiful little girl and random people always complement her on her looks, her afro puffs, her manners and intelligence so I was truly confused by her jealousy. In an effort to conform, my daughter I asked her what can she do better than the girl with the long hair? My daughter perked up immediately and stated that she was the best speller, recited poems the best, was always an All-Star student of the week, had the highest grades in the class on most tests and her art was always picked the “best in show”. My daughter went on and on about all the things she does well in and out of school but as soon as the topic of hair came up she immediately looked defeated.

Our ice cream was long gone by this time and on the ride home I explained to my daughter that she is the person she is meant to be. She should be proud of the way that she looks from head to toe because she is beautiful and unique. I explained that the term “good hair” is a bad word and not welcomed in our home. We then discussed the term “nappy” and “good hair”. I may have gone a bit too far by explaining the slave mentality and the Willie Lynch philosophy to a 5 ½ year old child but I wanted her to know where the term “good hair” came from.

I then went on to tell my daughter that “good hair” is any hair that grows on a person’s head. I asked her if her hair helped her get good grades, run faster, jump higher or read books better. She replied no to each of my questions. My daughter and I discussed the entire pros and cons of having longer hair. When she realized that the longer her hair was the longer it would take to wash and style it. My daughter was sold on her pretty curly puffs and her “cotton candy” hair. We then discussed the importance of being happy with yourself and simply not caring about what others say. She was told that the only people that she has to please are God, her parents and herself.

After dinner that evening my daughter, husband and I continued our conversation about “good hair” and how others should not influence what we think about ourselves. My husband even touched on the topic of that green eyed monster, jealousy(side note- thanks to that talk my daughter thought that the green eyed monster was real and slept with us for a full week!). We went on to listen to the India Arie song “I am not my hair” and continued to give our daughter positive affirmations and celebrate her. Before she went to bed for the night (in our bed) my daughter said her prayer. I asked my daughter if she had anything that she wanted to ask God or tell God. She thought for a few moments then she asked God to help the little girl with long hair to be nice to and stop talking like a slave. Clearly she got the gist of the message but was confused. She then thanked God for her cotton candy hair.

The next morning I woke my daughter up 30 minutes early so that she could make that decision on how to wear her hair for the day. Without a second thought my daughter asked for her “cotton candy” hair. We combed out her afro and placed an obnoxious princess crown headband on her head. She looked a bit nervous on the way to school but both my husband and I took her to school. When she walked into the classroom a few of the students pointed at her hair and one stated “ Aja’s hair is still not combed”. Her teacher was not amused and I received a stern look from her. Before I could say anything my daughter told the boy in a matter of fact tone “my hair is combed and it is just the way I like it slave boy!” Needless to say we had to go to the director of the school and explain the entire situation. She was also not amused and my daughter had to apologize for her inappropriate outburst. The director then talked to the entire class about diversity and how to treat people.

Again, I am not going to ever win a parent of the year award nor will I ever apologize for explaining the world as I see fit to my children. Today my daughter is a happy and healthy 10 year old child with an extra helping of self-esteem. She loves her “cotton candy hair” and does not let the opinions of others determine who or what she is. Shortly after my daughter and I had the “talk” I began transitioning from relaxed hair to being a natural bella.

The reason I wrote this blog is because I have encountered many people who say they can not go natural because they don’t have “good hair” like mine. My daughter is often stopped by strangers and random comments are made about her “good hair”. To this day my daughter will still say “thank you but I don’t have good hair I have my hair”. It truly saddens me that in 2012 people still buy into the “good hair” philosophy. I love the definition that that The Good Hair Diary adopted.  

GOOD (good) adj. -In excellent condition; healthy: Good Hair.

Weigh in!
 Can you relate? How would you handle this situation? How do you define 'Good Hair'?

Side Swept Two Strand Twists Into Bun

via BeadsBraidsandBeyond

Click photos to enlarge
Such a simple but elegant style and perfect for all ages!

The pictures are pretty much self explanatory so this post will be short and sweet. I cornrowed the top middle section of her hair straight down, as mentioned in our previous post and twisted the remaining hair. After finishing the top I grabbed medium size sections of wet hair, added a little products and finished the rest of the hair off by doing basic two strand twists. The next day, I gathered her twists into a side ponytail, leaving the "bangs" out. I rolled the twists around the ponytail holder to create the side bun. I then gathered the twisted bangs and pinned them so the side, near the bun with a couple of bobby pins. I twisted the remaining hair back around the bun and added a cute headband.

I wanted to try something new so I used Blended Beauty Butter Me Up and Curl Styling Butter for this style. (code cBB&B will get you 10% off blended beauty products!)

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