Shea Butter for Natural Hair: Healing Magic



These days shea butter is all the rage. You have probably spotted shea butter as a key ingredient in many types of shampoo, conditioners, hot oil treatments, soaps, lotions and creams. This article explores shea, what it is, where it comes from and how curly topped people can reap the benefits of this unique African product.

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3 Must Have DIY Hair Recipes For This Fall



Hola Chicas!

Looking for an all-natural/organic substitute for your shampoo, facial, leave- in conditioner, body lotion, and natural hair moisturizer?!  We got you.  Check out the quick and easy recipes below via CurlMix.

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How to Use Shea Butter to Soften Natural Hair





Packed with vitamin A, vitamin E, and essential fatty acids, raw shea butter is an all-around hair and skin care product with origins in West Africa. For decades, it has remained a favorite ingredient in the hair and skin care industry for multiple reasons.

The shea butter that most of us are used to is a butter that is extracted from shea nuts of the shea-karite tree. This buttery substance is usually then further processed to meet the needs and demands of the end user. However, many naturals have started purchasing the butter online in its raw form and whipping up their own product into a consistency that might be easier to apply to their hair or skin. Doing this can also provide DIYers the opportunity to add other carrier and essential oils to help enhance the natural properties of shea butter.

While there are many benefits of Shea butter on natural hair, here are the top 3 reasons why so many community members love this all-natural ingredient.

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Why You Need Shea Butter in Your Life.


If I were forced to make a choice of only one hair and body care product to use for the rest of my life, shea butter would be it. Shea butter is a miracle ingredient, and if its uses were tallied up they’d number in the hundreds.

While there hasn’t been a lot of research to back up many of the claims of shea butter benefits, there is no shortage of folk wisdom and testimonies singing its praises. And really, in a world of cosmetics laden with synthetic ingredients, finding a pure ingredient is a beautiful thing, especially when it happens to be so effective for so many women.

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7 Popular Butters for Soft, Healthy Natural Hair


Some of the most common natural butters that people adore include shea, coconut, and more recently, hemp. They benefit our hair and skin in the most appreciated ways and since they come from fruit, beans, seeds, and leaves. They are universal in their abilities to better the health of our tresses and they also have their own unique properties that give them varied assets. One of those properties is their fatty acids. 

5 Ingredients to Increase Moisture Retention this Fall


by Toia B of Luvtobnatural.com

We’ve been talking much about how protective styles in conjunction with moisturizing and sealing can be most beneficial for your hair this fall. To keep the theme going, I thought I’d run down a few of the oils and butters I like to use to keep my hair in the best shape possible as the temps continue to drop.

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DIY Whipped Shea Butter for Natural Hair and Skin



Like to keep it simple? This one's for you.  With a few drops of your favorite essential oils and a little bit of shea butter you can whip up a super creamy mix that's great for sealing moisture into your skin or hair! Give it a try and report back!

WHAT YOU'LL NEED
-8 oz raw unrefined Shea Butter
-1 Tbsp Jojoba Oil
-Spearmint Essential Oil
-Lemongrass Essential Oil
-Electric Beater
-Ziploc bag

Winter Routine Modifications and Natural Butter Recipes!


by Emme G. of CurlyBeautyBlogger.com

Hey Beauties!

Many of you may be familiar with the L.O.C. Method. I wanted to introduce you to what I call the L.B.C. Method that I use during colder months. First, let’s review!

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Understanding Hair Butters and Oils- Natural Hair


Tonya McKay writes;

Butters, oils, and waxes all come from fats that are derived from plants or animals, and have two basic components; fatty acids and alcohols. The difference between butters and oils is primarily whether or not they are solid at room and/or body temperature. Although they are both composed of groups of fatty acids, there are differences in the molecular composition and structure of butters and oils that are responsible for these differences in melting points.

Factors that determine melting point of lipids
  • Molecular weight – lower-molecular-weight fatty acids have a lower melting point, so that they are liquid at room temperature or body temperature. Higher-molecular-weight fatty acids form crystalline structures that persist to higher melting points, and so they are usually solids at room temperature and higher.
  • Saturated molecular structure — longer-chain fatty acids without any double bonds are straight chain molecules (like long snakes) that are able to closely pack next to one another This close-packing induces crystallization, which requires more energy to break apart than molecules not packed together into a crystalline or semi-crystalline structure. For this reason, the melting points of these types of fatty acids are much higher. This means the “oil” will exist in a solid state at room temperature or even body temperature.
  • Unsaturated molecular structure — unsaturated molecules have at least one double bond somewhere in their structure. This creates a kink or branching effect in the geometry of the molecule. This prevents unsaturated fatty acids from getting too close to one another, thereby preventing crystallization. These molecules have lots of space between themselves, which allows for more mobility of the molecules and results in a lower melting temperature. These oils may be liquid at room temperature or melt upon contact with skin.
  • Stearic acid, a saturated hydrocarbon molecule with 18 carbons (relatively long-chain fatty acid) has a melting point of 69.6°C (157.28°F). Oleic acid, a monounsaturated hydrocarbon molecule, has a double bond in it that creates a kink in its geometry, which makes it more difficult for adjacent molecules to pack tightly next to one another. It has a melting point of 10.5°C (50.9°F). Polyunsaturated acids, such as linoleic and linolenic, have multiple kinks in their chains and are liquid at very low temperatures (melt point = -5°C (23°F) for linoleic acid).
  • Linolenic acid, polyunsaturated fatty acid.
  • Linoleic acid, polyunsaturated, omega-6 fatty acid.
  • Oleic acid, monounsaturated fatty acid.
  • Stearic acid, saturated fatty acid.


Shea Butter v. African Butter- Natural Hair Care



by Shelli of Hairscapades

I don’t use shea butter a lot, but it is a natural product that I incorporate into my hair regimen in a couple of ways. When I first started experimenting with it 2010, I found it was too heavy and waxy to use as a sealer for my ends. It just sat on top of my hair like wax and made it look dull and ashy. Coincidentally enough, it just sat on top of my skin as well, though my skin would shiny … it would just come off on my clothes and chairs!!! So, I started using shea butter by mixing it with Eco Styler Olive Oil gel to smooth and control my edges. And, it works great for that for me.



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