Amla: Miracle Oil or Too Good to Be True?!



Where Does it Come From? 
Among the many botanical based ingredients currently popular in hair care routines, amla is perhaps the one that seems the most mysterious, at least from a chemistry point of view.

Amla is derived from the fruit of the Indian gooseberry or Phyllanthus emblica L., a deciduous tree found in both the tropical and subtropical portions of the Indian and Southeastern Asian countries.
The lemon-sized fruit is greenish yellow with attractive vertical striations and has a bitter, sour, and sweet taste. While amla fruit is primarily composed of water, it also contains a variety of sugars, carbohydrates, protein, fiber, minerals, and contains very high amounts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C). For many centuries it has been prized by practitioners of Ayurvedic medicine as well as many other groups for its reportedly amazing medicinal attributes as well as for its beneficial properties for hair and skin.

What Does it Do? 
Advocates who support topical use of amla for hair claim that it is has many uses:
  • cleansing agent
  • deep conditioning treatment
  • dandruff remedy
  • prevents graying of hair
  • darkens hair without use of dyes
  • imparts shine
  • improves hair growth
Read On!>>>

Where the Amla At, Tho? - Using Amla Oil to Promote Hair Growth

#Repost
#KnowYoIngredients
#TruthInAdvertising

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Remember that one time when I went to India?  Well, besides hipster trinkets like my fake nose ring, a gorgeous, ornate clutch and ALL the pashmina scarves, I also brought back a few beauty secrets!  Indian women are known for their strong, long, healthy locks.  And heads like this--


-- didn't even turn heads over there (well, except for ours).  Dope hair is what they do.  So when I was offered top shelf henna from M.S. Bitta and homemade amla oil from one of our hosts, Shakuntala, I didn't turn down nothin' but my collar.  I've been dipping into my private stash for the last 3 weeks and while the henna is not all that different, *insert Katt Williams voice* this sh*t right here... this amla oil situation, is something else entirely. I've been using it to pre-poo and my hair is, well.... 

#Fleekin

Amla Oil (coconut or sesame oil infused with dried amla pieces/powder) has been a staple in Indian households for centuries, and when used regularly as a pre-poo treatment, results in darker, shinier, THICKER hair.  They claim that it promotes hair growth and reduces premature hair fall.   I had heard all of this, so she didn't need to convince me... but my previous experiences with amla oil had been less than productive.   

1. Soft Sheen Carson Optimum Amla Oil- ($11/5oz)  I was gifted a few bottles last year and they were promptly re-gifted when I flipped the bottle over to check out the ingredients.  As you know, I'm all about that first five... if the 'featured ingredient' is suspiciously absent from the top of the list, I'm not here for it.  #WheresTheAmlaAtTho   In this case, it was number 8... of 10 ingredients... after the fragrance.  It's Natural Hair101, folks-- ingredients near the end of the list are typically comprised of less than 1% of the total. TheBeautyBrains appropriately refers to situations like this as 'fairy dust'--
'They are added to increase consumer appeal. These ingredients are also called pixie dust, fairy dust, marketing ingredients and a few other names. These are truly “inactive” because they’re added ONLY because they look good as part of the label. They serve no function other than to attract consumer’s attention. These ingredients include botanicals, vitamins and minerals, (some) proteins and just about anything else “natural.” You can easily spot these ingredients because they are often incorporated into the product name (Sun-kissed Raspberry Shampoo) or placed on the front label (lotion with jojoba oil). This depends on the product – if you have a shampoo with natural jojoba oil . It’s likely to be used as a featured ingredient. It would be at a very low level and it would be rinsed away.'
I cannot. They're charging what it would cost to source amla from India, except they don't have the decency to actually put amla in the damn bottles! 

#WhyTheseBrandsGottaLieFor #CantFoolMe #Next 

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