Pump Up Your Winter Skin Care Routine


by Sherrell Dorsey of Organicbeautyvixen.com

While the beautiful wonders of winter can mean hot cocoa by the fireplace and lots of great dinners with your loved ones, it can also be the best time to take pride in pampering your skin. With harsh weather on the loose and your favorite pair of boots covering up your feet, it can also be a great time to get a little lazy. But don’t settle for dry, rough or brittle skin.

Kick your beauty game up a notch and take special care with four ways you can fight winter weather and keep your skin radiant even in the cold.

  • Exfoliate – Just because you’re covered up, it doesn’t mean you’re supposed to get lax on your exfoliation game. Keep your hands, feet and legs super soft with a brown sugar and olive oil scrub during your daily shower.
  • Night Time Loving – Take your shower before bed and lay on the body butter or coconut oil nice and thick. Strap on your socks, a long pair of pajama pants and even a clean pair of manicure gloves to seal in the moisture for soft hands, feet and legs over night.
  • Fish Oil –Chocked full with Omega-3s, taking a daily fish oil supplement can help keep your skin supple with a natural, radiant glow that will make your skin look like it’s been on vacation. My favorite is Nordic Naturals.
  • Masquerade - Treat your face to spa time at home with kitchen remedies. Tighten pores, reduce the appearance of wrinkles and pamper your skin with an egg white mask. Once a week mix up your egg white mask, add some essential oil like lavender or your favorite scent and spread evenly with a makeup or mask brush. Leave on your mask for five to ten minutes to tighten on your face, rinse off with cool water and moisturize with a natural oil like almond and olive.

What do you do to keep your skin soft, beautiful and radiant during the winter time?


Sherrell Dorsey is a natural beauty expert, writer, speaker and advocate of health, wellness and sustainability in communities of color. In addition to creating OrganicBeautyVixen.com, Sherrell writes beauty articles for Tyra Banks's beauty and fashion site TypeF.com, Jones Magazine, MySalonScoop.com and Posh Beauty. Follow Sherrell on twitter at www.twitter.com/organicvixen and connect with her on facebook at http://www.facebook.com/OBVMedia


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CN Says:

My routine doesn't change much from season to season. I've learned that for my sensitive skin, less is more. I simply wash with water... just water and moisturize with Cetaphil Daily Facial Moisturizer (spf 15). That's it. Whenever I add extra steps I get pimples or fine bumps.

Do Brown Women Still Need Anti-Aging Products?

by Sherrell Dorsey of OrganicBeautyVixen.com

We all know that black doesn’t crack. It’s both a blessing and a curse as I walk down the street and teenage boys ask me to go to prom. I figure that when I am about 35 years old, I’ll actually start to look like I’m in my 20s instead of at 24 looking like I’m 17.

While darker skin does fare way better than our Caucasian counter-parts, our skin does age and should still be protected. I’m not saying to go out and purchase a ton of products, get some Botox or re-think a facelift, but do understand that aging skin looses elasticity, hair begins to thin and fine lines can make their way across our eyes and mouths.

Here are a few suggestions for keeping your gorgeous skin and hair youthful:

1. Drink plenty of water. Don’t deprive your body of the much needed universal hydrator. A hydrated body will result in gorgeous hair, skin and nails.

2. Eat well and exercise. Gobble down your leafy greens, salmon, nuts and beans in addition to hitting the gym, dance class or out door track to keep your figure lean and your external organs young and functioning normally.

3. Exfoliate. Whisk away dead skin to prevent hyperpigmentation and dark spots. I love the Rx For Brown Skin at home peel kit.

4. Step up your sun protection game. Yes we do need sunscreen so don’t skimp on the juice folks. Get a 2 for 1 with a foundation like Tarte Cosmetics (a vegan makeup line) that gives you coverage, moisture and SPF.



5. Seal in the moisture. Aging skin lacks moisture so keep your skin well hydrated. I’m talking hands, body and feet. Try lathering up at night, covering up with socks and long pants to lock in moisture and keep your skin sexy, soft and supple. I like Jason’s anti-aging body lotion made with green tea (which you should also drink plenty of).
6. De-stress. Don’t get stuck in the “to-do” list of life. If you’re not happy, complete or excited about what you do, who you do it with or how you do it honey it’s time for a wake up call! We only live once and the power within us is so much greater than succumbing to what the world says is acceptable. Prove them wrong and start living!

Do you have an anti-aging routine? Please share with me!


Sherrell Dorsey is a natural beauty expert, writer, speaker and advocate of health, wellness and sustainability in communities of color. In addition to creating OrganicBeautyVixen.com, Sherrell writes beauty articles for Tyra Banks's beauty and fashion site TypeF.com, Jones Magazine, MySalonScoop.com and Posh Beauty. Follow Sherrell on twitter at www.twitter.com/organicvixen and connect with her on facebook at http://www.facebook.com/OBVMedia

To Wax, Shave, or Laser your, um... Lady Parts?


by Sherrell Dorsey of Organibeautyvixen.com

A few weeks ago, my work out crew and I were stretching in the park after a run. One of my friendsbrought up a terrible experience she had just had at a spa after getting a bikini wax and asked everyone else what they did to “tame the shrew”.

The older I get, the more comfortable I am with talking about the va-jay-jay even when it comes to grooming. Oddly enough, when I worked as an esthetician, I gave a variety of bikini waxes to women of all walks of life, so I see our private areas as more of a science than something to hide away.

Nonetheless, as a brown woman what’s the best way to keep that lovely area groomed? Although most services and products come with their own level of pain and discomfort, our skin color and hair texture has a lot to do with which hair removal method is best for you.

Here’s an intimate guide to down-below hair removal for those too afraid to ask:

Waxing – Hold your breath and pull tight to undergo this quick but slightly painful procedure. While effective, on brown girls with coarse hair, removing hair with wax can be a little tricky and your technician may need to go over the same spot several times. The more you wax, the easier the hair will come out so if you stick with this method, you should do just fine. Try to find a spa that uses a natural or organic wax so that you’re not breathing in toxic fumes.

Shaving – You’ll have to invest time and money into keeping everything clean and you may have to shave every other day for a smooth finish. There are some razors you can buy with a small shaver made just for the bikini line. The only disadvantage to shaving is that hair can potentially grow back thicker and also cause your skin to become darker and you could risk ingrown hairs. Be careful and use plenty of light so that you don’t knick yourself below the belt.

Lasers – Zap away unwanted hair for a removal process that keeps hair at bay a little longer than any of the other processes. It does burn a little but again, like waxing, the more you do it, the less the pain you will endure. Most lasers don’t work that well on brown skin as they spot dark hair to remove it and can mistake pigmented skin for dark hair. There are a few places that have lasers that work on dark skin, but it’s far and few between. Ask your spa if theirs would work on you otherwise, don’t waste your money.

Nair – Just stay away. Nair has a harsh chemical smell that I wouldn’t put on my skin, let alone on a sensitive area.

Sugaring – It’s almost like waxing but with warm sugar. I haven’t tried the sugaring method myself but I hear it’s a little less painful, creates a nice smooth finish and is a fairly quick process. This natural hair removal method can last up to six weeks!

Different strokes for different folks people!

Let me know which methods you prefer or if you found something else that’s just as effective.


Sherrell Dorsey is a natural beauty expert, writer, speaker and advocate of health, wellness and sustainability in communities of color. In addition to creating OrganicBeautyVixen.com, Sherrell writes beauty articles for Tyra Banks's beauty and fashion site TypeF.com, Jones Magazine, MySalonScoop.com and Posh Beauty. Follow Sherrell on twitter at www.twitter.com/organicvixen and connect with her on facebook at http://www.facebook.com/OBVMedia

Take the Guess Work Out of Choosing Foundation

by Sherrell Dorsey of Organic Beauty Vixen

With the myriad product lines on the market it can get a little overwhelming as you begin to navigate makeup counters looking for the right foundation to match your skin tone. You can simply head to your favorite cosmetics counter and ask for a makeup application. Sephora, MAC and Aveda are great places that have well-trained staff and make-up artists that can help you. Simple applications are usually complimentary but some lines do charge a small fee for a sitting so be sure to ask prior to booking. View Entire Article

I'm Black, Do I Need to Wear a Suscreen?

by Sherell of Organic Beauty Vixen

...Yes, but beware of toxins!

I’m going to be completely honest with you. I just started actively wearing sunscreen a little over two years ago. I didn’t think it was a big deal to go out of the house without protection against the sun’s rays. Women in my family always said “black don’t crack”, so I assumed, like many of my brown-skinned OBV’s that I was naturally protected from the sun with the added benefit of always looking at least ten years younger than my actual age.

It wasn’t until I read this article on blacks and skin cancer that I got a rude awakening about the reality of how our “black don’t crack” adage is clearly causing us to danger ourselves with exposure to the sun. So now, because when we know better we do better, I do my best to lather up my sunscreen before greeting the day.

Before you go and run to grab that sunscreen understand that not all sunscreens are created equal. In fact, typical sunscreens are full of potential cancer-causing ingredients like Oxybenzone, which can cause leucocytosis, anemia, and can reduce organ weight and Para-Aminoabenzoic Acid (PABA), a known carcinogenic. The Environmental Working group did a study revealing that 84% of sunscreens are actually harmful to human health.

Protect yourself by using a physical sunscreen versus a chemical sunscreen. Check out the video review I did last summer talking about my favorite sunscreen.

For other options, check out this great list from the Environmental Working Group for finding the best and safest sunscreens.

If you aren’t sure about what’s in your sunscreen check to see how it rates on the Cosmetics Database. Keep your beautiful brown skin protected and your health as well.

Have you ditched your toxic sunscreen for a natural one?


Sherrell Dorsey is a natural beauty expert, writer, speaker and advocate of health, wellness and sustainability in communities of color. In addition to creating OrganicBeautyVixen.com, writes beauty articles for Tyra Banks's beauty and fashion site TypeF.com, Jones Magazine, MySalonScoop.com and Posh Beauty. Follow SherrellSherrell on twitter at www.twitter.com/organicvixen and connect with her on facebook at http://www.facebook.com/OBVMedia.

Why Moisture is Good for Your Skin, Too!


Joyce Clements of Naturallycurly writes;

Curly haired people understand the importance of moisture for their hair because it turns frizz into soft beautiful hair. Your skin needs moisture, too! Now this is the tricky part—all skin types, just like hair types, are not created equally. It all depends on how you take care of your body, hair and skin. They work together so you can be your healthiest.

Besides needing lots of water, your skin needs everything it takes to maintain a healthy body because your skin is the largest organ in your body. Your lifestyle affects your skin and the sun is the most damaging—even tanning beds will make you look old before your time.

The best way of keeping your skin beautiful is to keep it adequately hydrated. You need to feed your skin nutrients and drink lots of water to help maintain a youthful look.

Read more...

Hair Products That Cause Acne

Joyce Clements of Naturallycurly writes:

Want beautiful hair and blemish-free skin? Then you need to become a detective—actually a cosmetic ingredient detective.

The truth is that some ingredients may cause problems for you and not for other people. At the end of this article, we’ve included a list of ingredients that have been shown to cause acne. Or you can purchase a book on cosmetic ingredients for future research.

Try to Keep it Simple


If you have acne, do not use products that add any oil to your skin or hair. Ingredients labels don’t underline the acne-causing ingredients. When looking at products and acne treatments, always look for “non-acne” or “non-comedogenic.” Not oil-free, because it may still contain ingredients that cause breakouts. Stay away from isopropyl myristate, oils, and silicone, petrolatum, PVP, CVP and copolymer ingredients. Also sodium lauryl sulfate and ammonium lauryl sulfate are ingredients to avoid.

Wash and condition your hair before you wash the rest of your body. Do this to wash off any residue that hair products may leave on your skin. (Just think how hard it is to get grease off of dishes, you normally need to wash it several times to be grease-free.) It’s the same with hair products—they will leave a residue that can cause breakouts IF YOU ARE PRONE TO ACNE. Really clean the skin well to rid it of any product residue.

Click here to learn about the 10 Hair product dos and don’ts for clear skin!

Fix for Dry Lips


Naturallycurly writes:

Repair for dry lips can be found by mixing 1/4 tsp oil (olive or grapeseed works best), a pinch of salt and 1/8 tsp sugar. Apply to lips and cut an orange in half (not lengthwise but against the segments). Apply remainder of mixture to the orange. Gently press the orange to closed lips and twist the mixture covered orange over the lips gently for a few minutes to exfoliate. Rinse and follow with lip mask. For lip mask, mix 1/4 tsp sour cream, 1/4 tsp honey, 1/2 tsp oatmeal flour, 1/8 tsp olive oil, 1/4 tsp dry milk, and a few drops of orange juice. Apply to lips. Remainder can also be used on face or other dry areas. Before bed, cover lips with Vaseline to lock in moisture.

— Marina Valmy, director of Christine Valmy skincare company


CN Asks:

Have any of you ever experienced your lip gloss causing thin lines of white gunk in the corners of your mouth? What the hell is that?! How can it be prevented?

Recipe for Dehydrated Skin


NaturallyCurly writes:

Dryness on skin is actually dehydration . . . as weather gets colder, moisture drops to the ground, and there is less moisture in the air, causing moisture in the skin to evaporate. For dry skin, try 1 tsp finely ground cornmeal, 1 tsp sour cream, 1/4 orange (juice squeezed), 1/2 tsp grape seed oil or avocado oil, and 1/8 tsp salt mixed together to form a paste. Gently massage into skin for several minutes and rinse with water.

Skin Care Regimens


Jennifer writes:

Nikki, your skin is so clear and even. What's your regimen?


CN Responds:

Believe it or not, I don't have a skin regimen. I'm not a makeup person, and while I may dibble and dabble in the occasional eyeliner or mascara, I don't wear any foundation. There's a tinted moisturizer by SmashBox I like (and recommend), but still usually opt for a bare face with a dab of lip gloss.
With that said, I cleanse my face twice daily- - with water only most days, and probably twice a week with
Cetaphil's Daily Facial Cleanser. I also love the Yes to Cucumbers Face Cleanser Towelettes. I apply Cetaphil's Daily Facial Moisturizer every morning after washing my face, and pure shea butter every night before retiring. That's it!

I've never had acne prone skin, but my monthly visitor usually brings about a HUGE, monstrosity of a pimple... right in the middle of my chin. I let it do what it do, because when popped, leaves a horrible hyper-pigmented spot that lingers for months. For my skin, less is definitely more.


That's mine, what's yours? Does it change with the seasons?

Detoxify Your Beauty Regimen!


Susonnah of NaturallyCurly.com writes:

A beauty regimen is an excellent place to start dabbling in natural products, as the average individual slathers, lathers, rubs and sprays up to 10 different skin care products on his or her body every day. This means that the average woman is exposing her skin to up to 130 chemicals in her daily beauty routine. As a result, women absorb up to five pounds of chemicals a year. One solution is natural products. But what should a consumer look for when going to buy natural products?

Find out, HERE!

Healthy Food for Healthy Skin


There’s more to caring for your skin than just applying lotion. Having a well-balanced, nutrient-rich diet can help your skin look beautiful and stay healthy. ShopSmart magazine compiled a list of six skin-smart diet tweaks that you should keep in mind for your next trip to the grocery store.

Check out the list HERE!

Dr. Perry on Cellulite


Heavenly Body

Who doesn’t want to look their best for as long as they can? Society puts so much pressure on us to look a certain way, but does it encourage us to feel well, think well and live a purposeful existence? How hard do you work at having your inner light shine so bright that you emanate truth and serenity wherever you go?

The purpose of this article is to define and discuss treatment options for cellulite, the relatively superficial and annoying bane of many a female thigh. With that in mind, I encourage each of you to strive to be a heavenly body as much as you do to have one.

Cellulite is simply old- fashioned fat. The word commonly describes superficial pockets of trapped fat between connective tissue bands which create dimpling or “orange peel” appearance to skin on the thighs, hips and buttocks. There is conflicting research about cellulite and what causes it. Dermatologists believe cellulite can be genetic, and many researchers think there is a hormonal explanation for its development.
Although the causes are unclear, in some cases, the presence of cellulite is considered to be a normal variant of development, but the following factors have been thought to play a role:
Genetics, skin thickness, gender, age, distribution of body fat, hormonal factors (not clearly defined and there are no hormonal treatments being used effectively for treatment at this time)

Cellulite can appear in anyone at anytime, even in teenagers—whether you’re overweight, normal or thin. Generally, it is more noticeable as you age because your connective tissues get thicker and your skin gets thinner. Exercises that work all your lower body muscles from every angle will help to replace lost muscle tissue and give you a tighter appearance. So work your quadriceps, abductors, adductors, hamstrings and gluteals, along with your inner thighs, and outer thighs to make cellulite less noticeable.

Men mostly escape the scourge of cellulite because they have a thicker dermis that acts like a natural “girdle.” In men, the pattern of connective tissue holding fat cells is a cross-hatch pattern with double reinforcement. In women, the connective tissue is patterned like columns, making it easier for fat cells to bulge out between those columns, unlike the small openings between men’s connective tissue.

What to Expect from Treatments

Treatments for cellulite essentially work on appearance only. The surface dimpling is merely a symptom of cellulite. Actually, a treatment that could act beneath the skin would be much more effective than surface treatments, but to date most treatments are on the surface. Some commonly used treatments and their degree of efficacy include:

Dieting brings varied and unpredictable results, from improvement to worsening.

Dietary supplements
No proven benefit and these agents are not under FDA jurisdiction. No valid studies have been done. Ginkgo Biloba, sweet clover, fish oil, soy lecithin are the most commonly used herbal supplement which have been purported to change cellulite appearance by boosting metabolism, improving circulation, protecting against cell damage and breaking down fats.

Creams and Gels
Xanthines, retinoids, and alpha hydroxy acids in creams and gels are the most widely used treatments for cellulite. These products have been shown to reduce fine wrinkles or the roughness of facial skin, but no large-scale studies clearly have demonstrated the reduction of cellulite.

Body Wraps
Covering the body with linens containing a variety of substances like herbal extracts, algae, seaweed and mud have been used for body shaping. The combination of compression and perspiration results in losing fluids temporarily. Body wraps are great for relaxation and skin softening, but they don’t reduce cellulite.

Endermologie® temporarily reduces the appearance of cellulite using a motorized device rolled over the skin for smooth and regulated deep tissue manipulation. This treatment employs the use of an electronically powered device that pulls, squeezes and suctions affected areas. The action increases blood flow and lymphatic drainage, helping to eliminate excess fluid and metabolites. On average, a treatment lasts for 30-45 min and it takes 10-12 treatments before results are noticeable. Regular maintenance treatments will be required, because any improvements are temporary.

It is the first process approved by the FDA for temporary reduction of cellulite appearance. Ongoing research and several clinical trials with Endermologie have shown some promise.

Electrotherapy
Electrical muscle stimulators (EMS) are prescription devices used in physical therapy for treating specific neuromuscular issues. Some of these devices combine direct current with ions of soluble salt and penetrate tissues for some therapeutic benefits. The FDA does not consider these tools effective for cellulite reduction.

Laser/Light Therapy
There are 2 FDA devices that are being used which combine either topical suction or massage with light therapy.

A. Tri-Active- combines laser and suction

B. Vela-smooth combines laser and massage

Both are expensive (thousands of dollars) and afford only temporary reduction in cellulite appearance.

Liposuction
This is an invasive therapy used for removing fat from reserve fat layers, not the subcutaneous fat layer where cellulite resides. In fact, liposuction in the subcutaneous layer could cause profuse bleeding, swelling and scarring. Therefore, it is not usually recommended for treating cellulite. When large sections of fat are removed with liposuction, the appearance of cellulite is sometimes worse. Endermologie® is often used in combination with liposuction. There is a new combination of laser and fat manipulation called “Laser-Lipo” which reportedly dissolves fat and the deeply penetrating lasers tighten and thicken the skin. No clinical studies have been done on this new therapy.

Experimental treatments include Collagenase.
Collagenase is a naturally occurring enzyme in the body which breaks down collagen. Very preliminary studies have shown some benefit in the appearance of cellulite in a small number of subjects who were injected locally in affected areas. No long term studies have been done to determine the extent and duration of improvement.

Bottom line: Try to keep your hips, butt, and thighs strong and your skin smooth and no doubt, you’ll be one of very few to notice your cellulite.

Take care of yourself, so you can care for others. Do your best to be your best. The better you are, the brighter the world gets.



Disclaimer: This information does not serve as a substitute for individual medical care by a physician. This article is an informative guide to point you in the right direction. All product recommendations and advice are suggestions which may or may not work for your individual needs. Specific medical issues and concerns should be addressed by your health care provider. Patricia Perry, M.D. is a dermatologist in private practice in Southern California who can be reached for consultation at 2625 W. Alameda Ave., Suite 504, Burbank, CA 91505. Phone: (818)559- SKIN (7546).

Dr. Perry Talks Skin Cancer Prevention

Skin Cancer Prevention 101 and Sun Protection

"Don't worry about a thing,

'Cause every little thing gonna be all right.

"Don't worry about a thing,

'Cause every little thing gonna be all right!"

Rise up this mornin',

Smiled with the risin' sun,

Three little birds

Pitch by my doorstep

Singin' sweet songs

Of melodies pure and true,

Sayin', ("This is my message to you-ou-ou :")

-Bob Marley's lyrics to “Three Little Birds”


Mr. Robert Nesta Marley (aka Bob Marley) is one of my lifelong favorite artists. He was a very earthy and spiritual man who passed away too early. Fortunately, his gifted messages will always live on through his music. Did you know he passed away from Malignant Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer? Are you as shocked as I was to learn about this part of his history? Given his desire to always impart important messages to assist us in life, I am sure he would want us to understand the importance of enjoying the sun in a healthy way and to prevent skin cancer.

The main reasons to protect against intense sun exposure is to prevent skin cancer; however, other benefits of doing so include a reduction in areas of discoloration/uneven tone, and the prevention of photo aging. Sun protection is best achieved by using the appropriate clothing (long sleeved shirts), wearing sunglasses, a wide brimmed hat and judicious use of sunscreen. Sunscreens have come under some scrutiny and there are some misconceptions about their ability to protect the skin without preventing Vitamin D deficiency. The last step of Vitamin D synthesis occurs in the skin and requires UV light (sunlight). Sunscreens, contrary to popular belief, do not prevent the absorption of 100% of the sun’s rays. They do protect against a portion of the most harmful rays that we expose ourselves to on a daily basis (even on a cloudy day). We receive enough Vitamin D in dietary sources to offset the prevention of adequate Vitamin D formation by the use of sunscreen. In addition, most women should already be taking Calcium and/or Vitamin D supplements to prevent osteoporosis (thinning of the bones), especially if there is a family history of such.

It is recommended that to get adequate protection, one wear a sunscreen of at least SPF 15. SPF 30 affords more protection and I often recommend that patients who are more likely to get sunburns rather than tan OR patients with issues of discoloration use it instead of SPF 15. Sunscreen should be applied thirty minutes before going outside and reapplied every two hours while remaining out. Sunscreen should be reapplied after swimming, even if it says waterproof.

Daily use of a facial moisturizer with sunscreen (also used on the hands and chest, if exposed) is also a great way to protect from damaging rays. We are all exposed to UV rays daily, even while driving in a car.

Recommended Products:

-Titanium Dioxide is one of the best physical sun blocking ingredients.

-Neutrogena makes great sunscreen products. Cetaphil and Aveeno have great moisturizers with sunscreen. For those with sensitive skin, Vanicream has a great sunscreen without irritating preservatives, fragrances and dyes.

-Although Shea butter purportedly has some sun protective effect, the amount of protection afforded has not been determined.

Rates of skin cancer have been increasing, possibly due to the destruction of the ozone layer. We are all being subject to more intense and harmful ultraviolet rays. Although melanin (skin pigment) is thought to afford some degree of protection, it is certainly not completely protective. Any individual who notices a rapidly growing mole (nevus) or a newly appearing mole which is asymmetrical, has irregular borders, a variation in color, or a diameter greater than the size of an eraser on pencil should have it evaluated by a dermatologist. These changes could indicate Melanoma. Any new appearing growth which is very rough, scaly, exhibiting bleeding or crusting should also be evaluated, as these symptoms may indicate a Basal or Squamous Cell skin cancer. An annual complete skin examination by a dermatologist and periodic self-exams (including the palms, soles and mouth) are great ways to maintain skin health.


Disclaimer: This information does not serve as a substitute for individual medical care by a physician. This article is an informative guide to point you in the right direction. All product recommendations and advice are suggestions which may or may not work for your individual needs. Specific medical issues and concerns should be addressed by your health care provider. Patricia Perry, M.D. is a dermatologist in private practice in Southern California who can be reached for consultation at 2625 W. Alameda Ave., Suite 504, Burbank, CA 91505. Phone: (818)559- SKIN (7546).

Dr. Perry's Guide to Caring for Dry Skin


TURNING INTO A FLAKE?
A Guide to Caring for Dry Skin

When the ash monster comes to visit, you know you need to get busy moisturizing. Dry skin is not only uncomfortable and unappealing; it indicates a lack of attention to your personal well being. We’re all busy these days, but caring for your dry skin can make you feel better and proud that you care enough about yourself to do something special . . . just for you. The following tips can also be used to show your love and concern for someone special. I remember when my late maternal grandmother was in her last days. I bonded with her by massaging her frail, dry hands with thick, fragrant creams. She loved it and did I. Her hands had baked many a cake and wiped many a tear. They deserved all the TLC they could get. So do you!

As the seasons change, so must our skin and hair care regimen. In warmer weather, lighter moisturizers are needed to effectively moisturize without occluding the pores and creating a heat rash. In cooler, dryer weather, more intense moisturizing treatment is required to reduce the irritating effects of dry skin.

Managing dry skin involves three basic steps:

1. Cleansing with mild, nondrying cleansers
2. Gentle exfoliation with body scrubs and a pumice stone for your dry feet (1-2 times per
week)
3. Moisturizing, moisturizing, moisturizing!!

Body washes which contain emollients are a wonderful way to clean dry skin. There are so many products available for this process. Many companies offer products which contain a line of three items for each step. Lucky us!

Exfoliating requires applying a nice body scrub and using a loofah to gently massage away the dead skin cells which cause scaliness. A pumice stone can be used to exfoliate the thick skin which builds up on the soles of your feet.

There are three levels of moisturizing:
  1. Intense- Ointment based products trap moisture onto the skin surface most effectively. These products should be applied to soaking wet skin and massaged in. The extra water on the surface of the skin should be lightly towel dried. You may feel a bit sticky for a few hours until your skin absorbs the moisture. Using an ointment based product on hands and feet then covering with cotton socks overnight provides an intense moisturizing treatment for hard-to-treat areas of dryness.
  2. Moderate- Cream and butter based products are moderately effective in maintaining skin moisture. They can be applied to towel dried skin or during other times of the day. During winter months, it is a good idea to apply a cream based product after hand washing to keep hands soft and supple.
  3. Mild- Lotions and oils are the least effective in maintaining skin moisture; however they are the easiest to apply. These products are better reserved for warmer weather, as they do not tend to occlude the pores as easily as ointments and creams.
If your skin is very sensitive, be careful of using products that have heavy fragrance, as doing so may cause irritation.

Some recommended products:

Dove Body Wash

Neutrogena Sugar Scrub

Archipelago

Pomegranate Body Butter

Pomegranate Sugar Scrub

Pomegranate Polish

For ALL of you strictly natural ladies:

Maile Kawai- - Great body scrubs and emollients in flavors like Lilikon lemongrass, Coffee Macadamia Nut, Sugar Cane Ginger

Pure Fiji- - Sugar scrubs in yummy flavors (Coconut Milk and Honey, Pineapple, White Ginger Lily, and Mango). You can coordinate with the Hydrating lotion, Shower gel, Nourishing oil, and Room mist!

Kai- - Body polish, Body butter and lotion, and Body wash.

Hope this information helps you stay smooth and sleek!



Until next time . . .

Take care of yourself, so you can care for others. Do your best to be your best. The better you are, the brighter the world gets.




Disclaimer: This information does not serve as a substitute for individual medical care by a physician. This article is an informative guide to point you in the right direction. All product recommendations and advice are suggestions which may or may not work for your individual needs. Specific medical issues and concerns should be addressed by your health care provider. Patricia Perry, M.D. is a dermatologist in private practice in Southern California who can be reached for consultation at 2625 W. Alameda Ave., Suite 504, Burbank, CA 91505. Phone: (818)559- SKIN (7546).

Dr. Perry Talks Skin Care and Natural Hair

The doctor is in, and she's providing expert advice on skin care, healthy hair growth, scalp issues, and other natural hair issues. Meet Dr. Perry:


Patricia Perry, MD, is a New York trained dermatologist who recently relocated to California. She received her medical degree from Howard University College of Medicine. Her residency in dermatology was completed at Columbia University’s St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Division in New York City, where she also served as Chief Resident. She has practiced dermatology in New York and in Hartford, Connecticut and maintains medical licensure in both states.

Dr. Perry’s clinical areas of expertise include the diagnosis and treatment of skin cancer and disorders of pigmentation, as well as anti-aging and skin rejuvenation treatments and techniques.She is a member of the American Academy of Dermatology, the National Medical Association and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

Drum roll please..... Dr. Perry is also a fellow curly! She ducked and dodged the hot comb from ages five to nine, and rocked a relaxer from nine to 34. She then transitioned slowly by getting milder and milder relaxers for two years, and then stopped altogether for six months. She big chopped in 2002 and never looked back. She heat styles occasionally for trimming sessions, and to switch things up a bit; her hair in the pic above is the result of a blow-out and flat iron. Her staple style is a chic, curly bun! Below is the result of a Twist-n-Curl. She commented, "I find that Moroccan oil products and Monoi Tahiti Tiare oil work wonders for my fine ends".




 **If you have a question for our resident MD, please send your emails to [email protected]  Use "The Doc Is In" as the subject line. 

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