Use This Ingredient to Retain Moisture in Dry, Brittle Natural Hair

 photo courtesy of Beemore


Lecithin is an essential component of every cell in our bodies. Lecithin is a basis in the structure of cells that prevents the hardening of cell membranes. It is a fat that can also be found in several foods including soybeans, meats, vegetables, and egg yolks. According to Drugs.com, “Lecithin is the common name for a series of related compounds called phosphatidylcholines.” Healthy cells lead to a healthy body and maintaining a body’s resistance to many diseases that take advantage of damaged cells. One of the most well-known benefits of lecithin is supporting cardiovascular health, but some even say it aids in weight loss and relief of arthritis. Lecithin is natural-occurring in the body. It can also be consumed either through foods or as a supplement. The majority of commercial lecithins sold in the market today are from soybean, sunflower, and grape seeds.

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Should You Be Using Tea Tree Oil for Your Natural Hair?




Uses of tea tree oil
A renewed interest in natural substances has increased the availability of tea tree oil as a home remedy, and has also inspired research into its composition and beneficial properties. While it should never be taken internally due to potential toxicity, it is fantastic for topical treatment at home of:
  • dandruff
  • hair growth
  • acne
  • ingrown hair
  • superficial wounds
  • bug bites
  • thrush
  • athlete’s foot
  • fever blisters

Your Moisturizer Needs These 4 Ingredients to be Effective

 
by Susan Walker of Earthtones Naturals

If someone were to ask me what is the number one challenge with natural hair my answer would be maintaining appropriate moisture levels. This topic has been covered extensively but dry hair is the the number one complaint of many natural women I hear from and it warrants further discussion.

There has been a lot of confusion about what moisture actually is, how to moisturize hair and what ingredients should be included in an effective moisturizer. Products containing emollients such as mineral oil and petroleum, natural oils and butters as well as silicones have been marketed as moisturizers. Women have used these products with no relief to their dry hair. Brittleness has continued with ensuing breakage. Because of this we need to take a deeper look into this concept of moisturizing our hair, dissect the formulas and really understand what makes a product an effective moisturizer.

What is Moisture?
Moisture is a property of water and this element makes the best moisturizer. Hydration contributes to the pliability and elasticity of the hair. Because water can quickly enter and exit the hair it’s difficult for it to remain moisturized for long periods of time with just water. Factor in conditions such as high porosity and chemical damage and keeping the hair hydrated seems as though it’s a losing battle. This is where an effective moisturizer is crucial.

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Castor Oil: The Natural Solution to Hair Growth

By Dr. Phoenyx Austin of DrPhoenyx.com

I’ve known about this natural emollient since I was waist high. And I particularly love this oil because it is extremely rich vitamin E and essential fatty acids that are important for healthy hair growth.

A few benefits of castor oil:

  • Is an excellent emollient and humectant for skin and hair
  • Is a treatment for hair thinning and hair loss
  • Prevents the dry and itchy scalp
  • Has anti-fungal, antiviral and antibacterial properties- so it can be effective for treating skin/scalp infections like ringworm.
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The Two Ingredients that Make Your Conditioner Work




 by Susan Walker of Earthtones Naturals via Three Naturals

In a previous post we discussed the importance of conditioners to your hair care regimen. It is, in my opinion, the most important part. Given the role this product has in maintaining the health of our hair, we need to examine what we’ll likely find in conditioners that make them so important.

The main conditioning agent in conditioner is what’s called a cationic surfactant. Cations are positively charged particles and they are attracted to our negatively charged strands. They adsorb onto our hair meaning that they sit on our hair; they don’t penetrate. Additionally, they resist being washed off by water alone. They improve the hair’s softness, aid in detangling, help to seal the cuticle and make the hair more manageable.

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The Key to Finding the Perfect Leave In? Shop by Hair Width




by Nicole Harmon author of Coils & Curls: The Hair Product Handbook

It takes just the right blend of water (for moisture) and emollients (for smoothing) to tame coils and curls. The emollients are the tricky part. Too heavy and they’ll weigh your hair down, too light and you’ll end up with frizz.

To find the right leave-ins for your hair, it’s important that you understand your “strand thickness," otherwise known as "hair width", which can be categorized as “fine to medium” or “medium to thick”. When you see those words on a product label, they’re not referring to how much hair you have; they’re describing the thickness of each individual strand on your head.

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