5 Tips on Detangling Hair After A Workout

by Mary Wolff

Exercise is a necessary evil. We all know hitting the gym on a regular basis has health benefits that make it worth the effort, but for some curlies it has one particular downside that can be a pain to deal with. Tangles are a fact of life for lots of curlies after an intense workout session. Don’t ruin your post-workout endorphin rush by worrying about your strands! Here are a few of my favorite tips for detangling hair after a workout.

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How to Detangle and Lose Less Hair After a Protective Style

IG @DoyinBadewa

by Doyin Badewa

I am definitely here for finger detangling my hair and I have been doing it for months now. I had just taken out my faux locs and did not rethink continuing my regular finger detangling ritual before shampooing my hair and let’s just say it did not turn out so well. I ended up with a big mess of tangles and lost a lot more hair shed than usual. I realized that because I had the faux locs in for quite a while, after taking them out (and not detangling it for a few days after that), I had developed some major kinks that finger detangling alone was not able to remove. With the length and amount of my hair, I had to go back to my neglected faithful combs. If you ever fall into a hot tangling mess like I did, remember:


Detangling Natural Hair- Frequency and Length Retention

IG @curlbellaa

For many of us, it might as well be a four letter word. Some of us avoid it until our hair is on the brink of disaster, while others may do some form of it a few times a week or even daily. We all know the dangers of pushing detangling sessions too far back -- from breakage and matting to cutting out clumps of knots. But what about detangling too frequently? Is there a such thing as doing too much detangling?

There's an old adage that says, too much of anything is bad for you. By and large, that tends to be true. Detangling is great for releasing shed hairs, making the removal of buildup easier, and not to mention, it is the cornerstone of every fabulous natural hair style. But when done too often, detangling can lead to the following:

Detangling Made Easy!- Avoiding Tangles and Simplifying Washday

Washday blues…ugh! They will have you cursing for sure. We love our curls, coils, and waves but sometimes we get tired of the extra work many of us face during washday. I used to dread washday but now I have gotten my washday down to a science by planning ahead. This is a necessary component of healthy hair, so I put on my big girl panties and do what I gotta do!

Let’s not even pretend you do not understand what I am saying. You, yes you are the biggest culprit for your tangled washdays. I am calling you out (myself included), because we can make them easier if we take the time to ensure they run smoother. Here are a few ways to avoid tangles and simplify your washday.

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A Natural Hair Detangling Tip- Basically, Use All The Conditioner.


Hola Chicas!

Like me,  my sister, Syl, has been natural all of her life but had mostly worn it straight until recently. While we have a similar curl pattern, her density is friggin' bananas.  Like, she basically has no access to her scalp.  The 'wash day' struggle is real, especially the detangling process.  Like many of us, she stays pushing it off 'til the day after, the day after tomorrow and she's pretty much not here for the finger detangling.

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Denman Brush For Natural Hair: Should You Switch?

The Denman Brush is a very popular detangling tool among the curly community, but it has also been known to be a controversial topic. It is used mainly to detangle natural Type 3c and Type 4 hair when wet.

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Transitioners: 5 Detangling Techniques for an Easier Wash Day

 by Kanisha Parks of BlackNaps.org

When you decide to transition to natural hair, it’s important to have patience when detangling. Sometimes dealing with two textures can be rather frustrating: there will be times you wish you could just glide the wide tooth comb through your hair quickly and easily. Well, detangling can be made much easier if you have a few tricks up your sleeve, so if you’re having trouble enduring detangling sessions with your transitioning hair, try employing a few of these methods:

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Detangling Tips for Length Retention- Natural Hair Care

by Michelle of Radiant-Brown-Beauty

Let’s face it. Detangling your hair can be a chore. Sometimes you just don’t wanna! But, it’s inevitable. You've gotta let down your mane and get to detangling and removing shed hair… eventually.  If you never detangle your hair, it would eventually mat up. I’m not an expert on locs, but I think the only reason you wouldn’t want to detangle your hair is because you want to loc it.  At any rate, let’s assume detangled tresses and length retention are your goals. Hence the title of this post!

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Detangling Natural Hair- Wet or Dry?

We are often taught not to put a comb to our hair unless it is drenched in conditioner. We are also taught never to brush the hair when wet. So which is it? In what state is our hair weaker or stronger? To answer this question, we must understand the structure of the hair strand. Each strand of hair is made up of keratin proteins. Keratin has a long strand of amino acids made up of cohesive chains held together by the following chemical bonds: hydrogen, saline, hydrophobic, and the strongest of the bonds, disulfide bridges.

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Finger Detangling 101

Finger detangling is a delicate and intricate procedure. If done properly, it is entirely possible to go without combs and have an exclusive finger combing routine. This is especially beneficial for women who have hair that easily breaks during the detangling process. It is also possible to incorporate finger combing as a first part to your detangling routine prior to combing in order to reduce breakage.

Here are two very good videos that demonstrate the process of finger detangling on dry hair and wet or damp hair:

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Breaking One of the Detangling Commandments

(Please excuse the possessive “natural’s”, LOL!)

by Shelli of Hairscapades

Okay, so I may be (figuratively) hung, drawn, and quartered for this one. Alright … alright … I’m being dramatic. But … I’m about to suggest something that will probably go counter to a “natural hair” great commandment that most have probably read over and over again.


See, what had happened was … I’ve been detangling from TIPS to ROOTS for forever. Aaaaaaand, it has served me well for the most part. But, the last few wash days, I started breaking this rule. Let me premise this by saying that I primarily use my fingers and only pull out the Ouidad Double Detangler once my hair is pretty thoroughly detangled. However, my detangling sessions were becoming more tedious and lengthy due to the length of my hair. I would slather on tons of conditioner, but starting from the tips resulted in me having to work the shed strands in each section down the length of my hair over and over … AND OVER again.

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The Ouch-Free Guide to Detangling Natural Hair

One of the most labor intensive aspects of the natural hair journey is detangling. It can also be the most confusing. Let's go ahead and break it down:

Step 1
When trying to decide the best course of action for detangling your hair, it is always best to start with an understanding of how your hair behaves.

Ask yourself, is your hair:
  • curly, or tightly coiled?
  • transitioning or completely natural?
  • incredibly tangle prone when loose in water?
  • weak, brittle, or easily broken?

Never Underestimate the Power of the Shower Stream

by Shelli of Hairscapades

I’ve been meaning to write this post for a couple of months now to highlight, share and co-sign on a trick that I read on CurlyNikki long ago, but only started employing more recently. There are several viable and effective options for detangling naturally curly hair: dry with oil, slightly damp with oil and/or conditioner, wet and saturated with conditioner, fingers, wide-tooth comb, Denman, etc. I’m not going to go into the various techniques here, but if you want to learn more, check out this detailed post on CurlyNikki: Detangling Methods for Natural Hair.

Finger Combing Tight Curly Natural Hair

by Alicia James of MsAliciaJames.com

One of the scariest things about having tight curly/coily hair is tangles, tangles, and more tangles. Most of us with natural hair always opt for the hairstyle that will keep our hair manageable when it comes to wash day.

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Going Comb Free for Long Hair- Natural Hair Care

by Dawn Michelle of Minimalist Beauty

Growing up I was that kid who did her homework first, took weekly dance classes, read teen magazines cover to cover, then changed hair styles and nail polish almost everyday or every other day. I was so into fashion and beauty that I was given three teen magazine subscriptions for one of my birthdays. I read every beauty tip and tried many of them.

I was obsessed with those glossy pages to the point that my brother was annoyed that there weren't any magazines for guys his age. Because of his consistent comments, my mother and I created a magazine just for him with articles about health and dating which my mother wrote, and with fashion and style tips which was my department. His makeshift glossy pages had cut outs of photos from various magazines with especially written articles just for him. I doubt the magazine was really any good, yet it's the thought that counts. Right?

Now I have no idea why I've included this little story other than how easy it is to be influenced and sometimes confused by the glossy "pages" of information on curls and coils out there. There is information in magazines, on blogs, from vloggers, in books, and from product lines and hair stylists. Some say the same thing, while others consistently contradict themselves and each other. I guess the only way to really know what works for you is to try it.

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Finger Detangling 101

by Shelli of Hairscapades

As many of you know, I’m a fan of finger detangling. I started employing this method of detangling almost exclusively in February 2011 when I joined the Curly Nikki presents Kim Coles’ Grow Out Challenge. Prior to that, I used a wide tooth comb in the shower with conditioner saturated hair. However, last year I started experimenting with finger detangling and just found it to be far more gentle on my fine strands. I definitely attribute part of my length retention over the last year to it.

Finger detangling allows me to “feel” tangles so that I can carefully separate the hair and ease them out. With a comb, unless I hit a major snare that would stop the comb or brush in its tracks, I realized that I had more than likely been tearing through tangles. As I finger detangle now, I wince to think of the damage I was doing in the past with a comb because I didn’t feel the knots and ties. For those with hair of hardier stock, this may not be a problem. But, at the very least, I believe that combing through significant tangles prior to finger detangling disrupts the cuticle and, on the more severe end of the spectrum, causes breakage.

I finger detangle at a variety of stages. During my weekly pre-poo session, I “dry” detangle with Vatika oil and de-shed (remove “captured” shed hair) as I demonstrated in How I Pre-Poo. Dry detangling was something I would have NEVER though that I would do!! But, because my hair is almost always stretched from TnCs, twist-outs or bunned WnG and was well detangled the prior wash session, I am able to gently detangle and de-shed my dry hair with oil. That first finger-detangling session tends to take care of most of the heavy-hitters. Then, I will finish detangling under the water stream while rinsing my deep conditioner and finally after I apply my leave-in. As my hair is pretty detangled once I get to the leave-in step, I will sometimes gently “chase” my finger detangling with a wide-tooth comb. However, I don’t use the comb regularly. I have discovered that making certain that I do a final detangle after I apply my leave-in results in an easier detangling session the next wash day.

Anywho, here are a few tutorials that show how others finger detangle. As you’ll see, there is no one “right” way to do it. There are a variety of techniques, so you just have to figure out what works best for you!

Do you finger detangle? If so, how and why? If not, do you think that you would try it?

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