Should Conditioner Be Used On Roots?


by Mary Wolff

In the world of hair care, there seem to be contradicting statements regarding just about every aspect of your strands. One of the more debated elements of hair care is the matter of should conditioner be used on roots or avoided at all costs. Some say using conditioner on roots will lead to weighed down, flat hair that is extra oily. Others say not using conditioner on your roots will leave your strands dry, brittle, and thirsty for moisture. So, which one is right?

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Try These DIY Conditioners For Curls


by Mary Wolff

When it comes to caring for your curls, you may feel more comfortable creating your own products. Maybe you just don’t have the time to run to the store to pick up another bottle. Whatever the case, there are a ton of easy-to-make ideas for a DIY conditioner for curls. They use natural ingredients you probably already have on hand in your kitchen! Here are a few of my favorite recipes for a nourishing DIY conditioner for curls.

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Why You Should Avoid Fragrances in Shampoo


by Mary Wolff

We all want healthy, beautiful curls. One of the best ways to make sure hair stays this way is by protecting it from harmful ingredients in the products you use every day. One of the biggest offenders is added fragrances in shampoo. When looking for an easy way to help make hair healthier, avoiding fragrances in shampoos is a pretty quick fix. Still need some convincing? Here are a few reasons you should be avoiding fragrances in shampoos.

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Daily Conditioner vs. Deep Conditioners and Natural Hair Care



Conditioners have always been a hot topic of discussion in the curly hair realm. Are we using the right products for adequate conditioning? What is the best way to condition? Once the hair has grown from the hair follicle, it must be conditioned for the best preservation. We can find this external nourishment via hair product ingredients found in our daily conditioners and deep conditioners.

What’s in a daily conditioner?
A daily conditioner is also known as a surface conditioner, cream rinse, or finishing rinse. These are usually formulated to be used in conjunction with a shampoo. They are designed for daily maintenance and manageability for your hair by conditioning the cuticle, making it lie smooth, enhancing shine, and reducing frizz. Manufacturers usually recommend leaving a daily conditioner on the hair for 1-5 minutes before rinsing. The purpose of a daily conditioning rinse is to moderately adsorb ingredients onto the surface of your hair. According to our Curl Chemist Tonya McKay, "adsorption describes the process when atoms or molecules are attracted to the surface of a material (hair)."

Characteristics of A Good Conditioner


Tammy Goodson of CurlyChics

Ask almost any natural woman about the top concern about their mane and most will tell you moisture retention. Textured hair has unique challenges in that it craves moisture as if its life depends on it and truth be told, it does. Conditioners are every curly girl’s answer to combating dryness but here’s the thing, not all conditioners are created equal. Here are a few attributes that separate the men from the boys.

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Leave-In Conditioner: Do You Really Need One for Your Natural Hair?



Written by Christina Patrice of MANEOBJECTIVE

For the majority of the time I spent transitioning, I never bothered purchasing a leave-in conditioner. Not a single one.

As far as the blogs were concerned, leaving some of my regular conditioner in my hair after washing, or mixing some concoction of conditioner, water, and oil was good enough. While there are certainly benefits to the aforementioned methods, now that I am completely natural, I tend to rely more on products that are labeled exclusively as post wash leave-ins. Why? We'll get to that in a second. But first, let's break down a few facts:

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What is a Hair Conditioner?- Moisturizer vs Emollients




Marketing statements for hair conditioners contain a variety of terms to describe the properties of the products in a manner that is enticing to consumers. Included in these are familiar words such as: emollient, moisturize, seal, penetrate, repair, and condition. Ingredient savvy consumers often seek to attribute specific properties, such as “emollient” or “moisturizing” to groups of ingredients in an effort to predictably define which products can meet the unique needs of their hair type. Due to some ambiguity in the usage of many of these terms, a number of questions come to mind when endeavoring to categorize materials in this fashion.

What criteria must be met for a product to be considered a hair conditioner? What are the exact definitions of the various marketing terms when applied to hair care products? Are any of them interchangeable? What properties make an ingredient moisturizing, emollient, or conditioning? Is it possible for an ingredient to be both moisturizing and emollient? Are there more accurate and precise words that we could be using to describe these properties and ingredients? Obtaining the answers to these questions can alleviate much of the confusion surrounding additives in hair conditioning products.

What is a hair conditioner?

A hair conditioner is a product which, when applied topically, can improve the overall quality of your hair’s surface and bulk properties. Their benefits include increased slip between hair strands (and easier detangling), a smoother cuticle surface, decreased porosity, optimized hydration, decreased electrostatic charge, added body and bounce, and increased strength, suppleness, and elasticity. Specialized products may also provide protection from thermal and UV damage, as well as improved color retention. Some of these effects are purely superficial and temporary, requiring frequent reapplication to maintain the properties, while others impart long term benefits by the reduction of damage on a daily basis.
In order to achieve this high level of performance, a conditioner formulation must combine a complicated array of ingredients that both individually and synergistically contribute different properties to the whole package. Generally, the most basic objectives a conditioner must meet are to provide hydration, lubrication, and occlusion to the hair. Two common and often confusing terms used to describe the properties of various ingredients in the product are “moisturizer” and “emollient”. These terms are used in variable ways in marketing statements and in the literature, and are a frequent source of confusion for users.

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