6 Ways to Fix Damaged Natural Hair, Now.

IG @thejanellewatkins

by Dr. Aziza Glass of Azizaglass.com

So your hair looks amazing and luscious…and then you look at your ends. Or maybe just less than 24 hours after spending all the time and effort into moisturizing your hair…it feels rough and sounds crunchy. If this sounds familiar, it’s most likely you have dry and damaged hair. Thankfully this is not the end of the world and you can bring your hair back to its luscious glory.

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How to Tell if Your Natural Hair is Damaged



Do you know what damaged hair looks like, feels like, and even acts like? Often, we get used to the way our hair behaves (or doesn’t) and ignore the signs of true damage. Bald patches, clumps of hair falling out, or thinning edges — these are easy to spot. But what about the other, less-obvious signs that your hair is in serious trouble?

If you comb, brush, shampoo, chemically straighten, or use heat-styling tools or permanent color, the fact is, you are in some way or another harming your hair. Even pulling your hair into a ponytail too often can be destructive. Before you throw your hands up in the air and surrender, know that it is possible to prevent this damage. You just have to know what to look for.

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Stop Doing This to Your Natural Hair

Photo Courtesy of Lorado -- Getty Images


Hair care is all about preservation. Your hair is not living like your scalp; it can be temporarily repaired but not permanently restored. Everything in hair care is meant to help maintain and style it. As your hair grows and you retain length, your hair is healthiest at the roots and usually the most damaged at the ends, which is why trims help to retain length. Before purchasing products and building a new regimen, it is helpful to understand how damage occurs and basic ways to maintain your curls.

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4 Ways to Use Rose Water for Damaged Hair


Humans and roses are involved in an enduring love affair. We love to use rose water, especially, in beauty products, perfumes, and even in cooking — mainly in Middle Eastern recipes. Rose water is made by steeping or steam-distilling rose petals in water in order to isolate the plant’s essential oils. Rose water is a natural but gentle astringent that can soothe irritated skin and scalp. It naturally conditions and moisturizers because it is rich in flavonoids and vitamins A, B3, C, D, and E. The sugars in the rose petals add to the rose water’s calming effects.

Rose water has been said to stabilize hair’s pH balance because its pH is similar to that of hair. Some say it can aid in repairing hair’s damaged porosity. It acts as an anti-inflammatory, and with its natural antiseptic properties, it can reduce or lessen dandruff caused by fungal infections. Some even believe it promotes hair growth. It is thought to have stimulating properties.

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Stop Natural Hair Breakage, Now!

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by Sabrina Perkins of SeriouslyNatural.org

There are just some hair maintenance "musts" that one must do to ensure they keep healthy hair. Some are no-brainers like washing hair while others seem counter-productive. Believe me when I say it is like pulling teeth to get some to understand the importance of a biggie like hair trims.

Hair trims are important to any successful hair care routine. For women with natural hair, keeping up with a regular trimming schedule is critical for preventing damage and maintaining length. However, far too many naturals fail to understand just how important it is to keep up with a regular trimming schedule. Here are 5 reasons why you need to stop skipping your trims and make them priority.

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Can I Reduce Breakage Without Getting a Trim?


by Amanda

Q: How do you reduce breakage/shedding other than trimming?

A: Let’s start by discussing the difference between shedding and breakage.


What is hair loss?
"When your hair naturally falls from the root, you are experiencing hair loss. Some amount of hair loss normal and to be expected.

In fact, while you may not be aware of it, you’re likely losing up to 100 strands each day. The “100 strands” theory is based on the assumption that we have approximately 100, 000 hairs on our scalp and lose around 1% of them daily.

Additionally, the rate at which you’re losing hair can vary based on gender, diet and genetics.

What is hair breakage?

Curly hair is especially prone to breakage. You may experience breakage when combing, detangling, or styling your curls. Breakage is most noticeable when brushing or combing your hair, removing a hair band, or in the shower.

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3 Easy Ways to Prevent Split Ends for Healthy Hair


Source: Tamullar (Long Hair Community)
by Shelli of Hairscapades

Did you know that there were this many kinds of split ends? Pretty nasty, right? Well, I can attest to the validity of this chart. Because, about 2 1/2 years ago, I saw just about every split end on it (except the white spots) in my own head of hair. It was bad y’all. I mean, baaaaaddddd! That’s when I took to carrying around purse scissors … so that I could take split ends to task at a moment’s notice, any time, any place (seriously, I was out of control)!

2011 NYC CurlyNikki Meet-Up: Told ya!

But now the split ends are few and far between and have been for quite a while. Let’s put it out there. I have fine strands. So,  I’ll probably always get split ends no matter how protective I am of my hair/ends (unlike my compatriots with strong, thick-strands ). But, now I generally only see the vanilla variety, single “split” end … and they tend to be far rarer and very small.

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A Hidden Cause of Hair Breakage Revealed and How to Fix It


by Sabrina Perkins of SeriouslyNatural.org

The one thing that is hammered into every natural-haired woman’s head is that the hair needs moisture, moisture and more moisture. While this may be true, there is a point where moisturizing your hair too much can actually cause damage to the cuticle.

This point is called Hygral Fatigue and is a direct result of over-moisturizing the hair. With the ever-popular Maximum Hydration Method on the rise, it is important that we know exactly what we may be subjecting our hair to if we aren’t balancing moisturization with protein treatments. Here’s what you need to know about hygral fatigue.

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Preventing and Treating Natural Hair Damage #LikeABoss




Damage is a barrier that will prevent you from seeing hair growth. Your hair is actually growing all the time, but with damage in the way, your hair is breaking off at the same rate it is growing, which is why there will appear to be no growth progress.

You have to slow down the rate at which you damage your hair. Reduce is the word of choice used because it is impossible to eliminate all damage. Your hair is damaged to some degree every time you wash it, detangle it, and even touch it.

We will concern ourselves with the 4 types of damage that can occur and how to prevent these sources of damage altogether:

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Healthy Natural Hair vs. Damaged Hair: Are They the Same?

 
by Susan Walker of Earthtones Naturals

In our quest for knowledge as naturalistas or transitioning divas our goals are two-fold: To achieve healthy hair and for our hair to “grow”. Well, that’s not what we really mean is it? Our hair grows. It grows at varying rates monthly and throughout the year and its growth is based on our genetics, our overall health, nutrition, hormones, etc. But it does grow. What we are most interested in is the retention of length. If your hair breaks just as much as it grows then you’re not going to see the lengths adding up. Our hair care regimes – as simplistic or complex as they are – are implemented to prevent damage.

With all the care you’ve taken of your hair, would it surprise you to know that even if you don’t have overt signs that your hair is in fact damaged? And the longer your hair is, the more damage it has sustained?

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How Hydrolyzed Wheat Protein Stops Natural Hair Breakage



Our beautiful hair strands are 91% hard protein also known as keratin, which is responsible for the strength and structure of the hair strand and very important to hair care and hair growth. As the hair grows it can gradually get weaker at the ends, as the hair shaft has been chipped away by the elements and general manipulation from hair care and styling. The ability to keep the hair strong, while maintaining moisture to the strand is a balancing act. Too much strength could make the hair hard and brittle while too much moisture can make the hair mushy, both of which are not the ideal situation for hair. According to Hilda Sustaita, wheat protein is considered a gentle protein, broken down into smaller portions to penetrate the hair shaft and adhere to cracks along the cuticle layers.


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4 Ways You Might Be Breaking Your Natural Hair Without Realizing It



Natural hair might be healthier than relaxed hair but that does not mean it is invincible. Everyone loves the style versatility of natural hair. It can be straightened, colored, roller set, and blown it out while maintaining its fullness, which is usually compromised with relaxed hair, especially over time. With that being said, hair is still hair. It is merely dead skin cells that are preserved through proper maintenance. Part of proper maintenance and length retention is low manipulation. Since curly and coily hair is naturally drier than straight hair, it is more vulnerable to breakage. Everyone’s hair cannot withstand high manipulation and here are four ways you might be breaking your hair without realizing it.

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Reasons Your Fierce, Picked-Out Afro May Cause Hair Damage



Before addressing what you should start doing, let’s discuss what you should stop doing. When people approach me for hair care advice, the two consistent causes of concern are dryness and breakage, which is often misinterpreted as lack of hair growth. When prompted for questions, the two reoccurring issues in the regimen are lack of deep conditioning and dry combing. No, I do not mean detangling with an oil in small sections. I mean using an afro pick and maybe Luster’s Pink lotion finished with oil sheen. For decades people with afro-textured hair have been raised to comb their hair while dry, and this can cause damage when done improperly. It also stirs confusion when people want to return to their virgin coils and do not understand why their dry hair does not look like their wet hair. The afro style is equally as beautiful as a twist out or wash and go, but it must be done properly and infrequently. Until you understand how to properly achieve the style, here are the reasons you should stop picking your hair out.

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Heat Protection 101: Fry Eggs, Not Hair.



Fall is approaching and some curlies are ready to fry, dye, and lay those curls to the side, but this should be approached with caution. I know you want to use that edge control to get that swoop game tight this season, but there is a right way and a wrong way to do it! Some curlies are anti-straight but one thing is for sure, all curlies are pro “don't put me in a box” so let’s support one another’s choices. If you choose to take advantage of the cold weather for long-lasting straightened styles, then you should do so with the utmost care to protect your curls, coils, and waves. 

Restoring Natural Hair Elasticity



Elasticity has been a way in which we gauge healthy hair and is most noted for attributing bounce and movement to the hair. Elasticity is determined by your hair’s ability to stretch and return to its natural state. Everyone’s hair stretches at different rates. Hair Finder says typically hair can stretch up 50% its size when wet and 20% when dry, as wet hair is more malleable compared to dry hair.

Your individual elasticity is based on many factors beginning with the density of each hair strand. If you have thick hair, you can expect a higher level of elasticity compared to fine hair.

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4 Signs That it’s Time For a Trim!


by Toia B of luvtobnatural.com

I totally get why many shy away from trimming. Hair shrinkage coupled with the fear of scissor-happy stylists make some naturals run the other way. When you’ve worked hard to achieve and maintain some length, you’re not tryna hear nothin’ bout no trim!

While quite a few naturals shudder at the sound of a pair of shears, others have come to grips with the fact that trims are, in fact, necessary for overall hair health. Yes! While some may not need one as often as others, they’re good for you! The question comes up, though, “how will I know when I need one?”

Here are four things to look out for:

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Effective Strategies for Damaged Natural Hair


by Susan Walker of DrWalkerWellness

If your hair has extensive damage then you’ll definitely want to implement some effective strategies to improve its health. Since there is no way to really permanently repair damaged areas, preventing further damage and addressing existing issues will enhance the look and condition of your hair. I’ve developed a simple 3-step program to successfully accomplish this.

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Common Causes of Hair Damage and Growing Long Hair

Glam Idol Ngozi

by Susan Walker of DrWalkerWellness.com

As naturals our search for hair care knowledge usually fulfills a couple desires:

1. To achieve “healthy hair”

2. For our hair to grow

Well, that’s not what we really mean is it? Our hair grows. It grows at varying rates monthly and throughout the year and its growth is based on our genetics, our overall health, nutrition, hormones, etc. But it does grow. What we are most interested in is the retention of length. If your hair breaks just as much as it grows then you’re not going to see the lengths adding up. The truth is that our hair care regimes – as simplistic or complex as they are – are implemented to prevent damage.

Read On!>>>

Minimizing Natural Hair Damage


by Nicole Hollis of Hair Liberty

When you're enthusiastic about hair care and dedicated to a healthy hair journey it can be difficult to be objective about your hair. It's easy to talk about things that keep the hair healthy like gentle handling, good conditioners, and low manipulation, but if those were the only things that mattered, everyone's hair would be doing great. In reality, despite meticulous efforts to grow a long, thick head of hair, many women still struggle to maintain length and reach their other hair goals. To get past a length hurdle or stop persistent breakage you have to realize one important thing: Damage is unavoidable. If your hair isn't making progress that means it's being damaged faster than it can recover. Many natural women already steer clear of heat and chemical treatments, but mechanical damage is still an issue and it can be difficult to recognize.

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Natural Hair Breakage- 5 Tips for Prevention



If you’re looking to rock longer (or in my case, BIGGER!) hair, your time is better spent focusing on length retention. There’s not much you can do to force your scalp to grow hair faster, but you CAN focus on hair care habits that prevent breakage and make sure every inch you grow is maintained throughout the months and years. Although the entire length of my hair is rarely exposed to the elements (yay shrinkage!), there are five important things I do to handle my coils with care.

1. Don’t go guerilla during washing
There comes a morning in every natural’s life when you wake up and realize your TWA has transformed into a massive force field of gloriously textured hair. It seemed like just the other day you could wash and condition in six minutes, right? Well, “just the other day” was actually two years ago, and now you must find efficient ways to care for your coils without losing your sanity. Don’t attack your hair! Grab some butterfly clips and divide your hair into manageable sections. No more swirling your hands around an entire sudsy head.

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