Grow Longer, Stronger Natural Hair With Regular Hot Oil Treatments

IG @brigiteeeee

by Alexandria Jones via SeriouslyNatural.org

What’s a Naturalista to do when her hair is being crazy and uncooperative? A hot oil treatment!

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Source: IG @Heyitsbrittanyj

by Sointocurls via blacknaps.org

Have you ever heard of mongongo oil, baobab oil or illipe butter? These oils are packed with nutrients for hair and skin care, so if you are always on the lookout for oils filled with nourishment, keep reading!

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Apricot Oil for Softer, Fuller Natural Hair


by Sabrina Perkins of Seriouslynatural.org

From olive to coconut, it seems as though every oil we come across is better than the next. It’s easy to get caught up in the hype, especially when we see our favorite You Tubers and hair crushes raving about the newest trends.

Although most of us would like to argue that coconut oil is the be-all-end-all solution for everything from dry scalp to crusty feet, apricot oil has been making waves for a while as possibly being one of the best oils in the game. So what’s so great about it? What is it about apricot oil that has everyone in such a tizzy?

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Amla: Miracle Oil or Too Good to Be True?!



Where Does it Come From? 
Among the many botanical based ingredients currently popular in hair care routines, amla is perhaps the one that seems the most mysterious, at least from a chemistry point of view.

Amla is derived from the fruit of the Indian gooseberry or Phyllanthus emblica L., a deciduous tree found in both the tropical and subtropical portions of the Indian and Southeastern Asian countries.
The lemon-sized fruit is greenish yellow with attractive vertical striations and has a bitter, sour, and sweet taste. While amla fruit is primarily composed of water, it also contains a variety of sugars, carbohydrates, protein, fiber, minerals, and contains very high amounts of ascorbic acid (vitamin C). For many centuries it has been prized by practitioners of Ayurvedic medicine as well as many other groups for its reportedly amazing medicinal attributes as well as for its beneficial properties for hair and skin.

What Does it Do? 
Advocates who support topical use of amla for hair claim that it is has many uses:
  • cleansing agent
  • deep conditioning treatment
  • dandruff remedy
  • prevents graying of hair
  • darkens hair without use of dyes
  • imparts shine
  • improves hair growth
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What’s the best plant based moisturizer for hair and skin?

IG @kentekinks 

CN Says: 
Although this article focuses on skin care, we use these same ingredients in our hair! I hope it helps! Spoiler alert- shea butter, rice bran and olive oil are the winners ;) 


Q:  Rebecca asks us to recommend the most effective, longest lasting, all around best plant-based moisturizer for skin. In our response we talk about the different methods of moisturization and what it means to be “plant-based.”

A: 3 methods of moisturization.

1. Occlusives
Purpose: To reduce how much water evaporates through your skin. (Cosmetic scientists refer to this as TransEpidermal Moisture Loss or TEWL.) Occlusive agents form a hydrophobic barrier on your skin that keeps the water on the inside. The most effective examples include petrolatum, mineral oil, and dimethicone. Some plant oils help occlude the skin but typically they are included more for their emolliency.

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Is It Safe to Melt Coconut Oil in the Microwave? #GeekOut



Lindsay Girl asks: I have used extra virgin coconut oil in my hair as a deep conditioning treatment once a week for several years now. I melt the oil in the microwave. This morning I was reading in an article on the naturallycurly.com website that the author of the article “heard” that you shouldn’t warm coconut oil in the microwave because that will “alter the bonds” in the oil. What say the Brains? Can I safely put the coconut oil in the microwave to melt it? Or is there a better way?

The Beauty Brains responds:
When LG raised this question in our Forum we said “no problem.” But after further consideration we realized that there is some risk involved with heating coconut oil in a microwave oven.

The danger of microwaving coconut oil

Coconut oil penetrates hair because of its size and the configuration of its carbon chain. Unless you’re heating it above the point where it will decompose, microwaving it should cause no problems. In other words, “melting” it is just fine. BUT you need to be very careful when using this approach. Here’s why:

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