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KinkyShea’s Health and Fitness Tip of the Week

By January 27th, 20215 Comments

KinkyShea's Health and Fitness Tip of the Week

Recipe of the Week:

Bananas in Brown Sugar-Rum Sauce
(from www.eatingwell.com)

Bananas cooked in a delectable brown-sugar-rum sauce make for a quick yet impressive dessert.

Ingredients (makes 2 servings):
2 tablespoon
brown sugar
1 teaspoon
butter
1/2 teaspoon
canola oil
2 tablespoon
dark rum
1 teaspoon
lime juice
1/8 teaspoon
ground cinnamon
2 small bananas, quartered
1/4 cup
low-fat vanilla yogurt

Directions:

Stir brown sugar, butter and oil in a medium skillet over medium heat until bubbling. Add rum, lime juice and cinnamon and cook until slightly thickened. Add bananas and cook, stirring, until tender. Divide between 2 bowls and top with a dollop of low-fat vanilla yogurt.

Nutrition Information (per serving):

Calories 208; Carbohydrates:53g; Fat 3g; Protein 4g; Dietary Fiber 3g; Cholesterol 5mg; Potassium 399mg.

Fit Tip of the Week:

Strength Training With Resistance Tube or Bands

For the times when getting to the gym isn’t possible, or for those who want the benefits of strength training in the comfort of their own home without expensive and bulky weight equipment, resistance tubes (or bands) might be just the answer. Resistance tubes or bands are an effective, inexpensive and portable way to get a full body strength-training workout at home, in the office, or pretty much anywhere. Resistance tubes or bands can be found in sporting good stores, T.J. Maxx, and even Wal-Mart, plus they fit easily into a purse, work bag or luggage. Here are a few examples of exercises that can be done with resistance tubes or bands. Remember that it is important to warm up for five to ten minutes and gently stretch the muscles you plan on working. Beginners should start with 12 to 15 repetitions of each exercise while more intermediate exercisers (those that have been lifting weights for up to three months) can perform one to two sets of each exercise. More advanced strength trainers (those who have been lifting weights for more than three months) should try to complete two or three sets of 12 to 15 repetitions. Remember to stretch each muscle group after each set and at the end of your workout to help improve flexibility.

Seated row (for lats):
Sit on the floor and grasp the handle or end of resistance tube or band. Wrap the tubing or band around a bedpost or some type of sturdy anchor close to the ground and grab the other end of the tube or band. Lean back so there is tension in the tube or band when your arms are extended forward. Extend your legs in front of you with the knees slightly bent. Pull the ends of the tube or band so that your elbows form right angles while you squeeze your shoulder blades together. Be sure to keep your spine in neutral and slowly let your arms extend back into the starting position.

Bench press (for pecs):
Secure the center of the tube or band at chest level and face away from the anchor, grabbing the ends of the tube or band. Begin with your thumbs at your armpits and step far enough away from the anchor so the tube is not gapping at its starting position. Fully extend the arms in front of your body and slowly release returning to starting position.

Military Press (for deltoids):
Stand on the center of the tube or band with your feet about shoulder width apart. With your palms facing upward and your hands by your shoulders, extend your arms straight up keeping your back straight (without arching) and your abdominal muscles tight. Slowly return to starting position.

Triceps extension:
Step of the tube or band and pull one handle up behind your head. Bring your elbow close to your ear and with your arm bent behind you, extend your arm straight up until your arm is straight and lower back to starting position. Remember to switch arms. If you’re using a lighter resistance tube you can stand in the center of the tube or band (feet shoulder width apart) and work both arms simultaneously.

Biceps curls:
Step on one end of the tube or band grab the ends with the same hand. Be sure there is some tension on the tube or band when your arm is extended down by your side. With the palm facing forward, bend the elbow bringing your hand up to your shoulder. Keep your wrist straight and bend only at the elbow. Slowly release to start position. If you’re using a lighter resistance tube you can stand in the center of the tube or band (feet shoulder width apart) and work both arms simultaneously.

Squats (for quadriceps, hamstrings, and glutes):
Standing on the tubing so your feet are shoulder width apart, grab the ends of the tube or band with both hands. Hold the handles up by your shoulders and bend as if you are going to sit in a chair. Slowly return to standing and repeat. Make sure that you keep your back flat and contract your abdominal muscles.

Kneeling crunches (abdominals):
Anchor the tubing or band above your head and let the handles drop down (a door can be used for this). Kneel on the floor so that the anchor is behind you. Hold the ends of the tube or band with your hands up by your ears (elbows in). Bending from the waist, curl down bringing your head towards your knees and keeping the ends of the tube or band by your head. Slowly return to start position and repeat.

And there you have it. Seven exercises that can be done with inexpensive resistance tubing or band in the comfort of your own home or in your office during a lunch break. Resistance tube or bands, like free weights, vary in tensile strength allowing for progression in your strength training routine.

Until next week…

KinkySheaPT

5 Comments

  • KinkySheaPT says:

    Hey everyone!

    To Anonymous #1: I can see how pics can be helpful. Some people really like to have visual aids. So what I will do is take a few pics of myself doing these exercises to give you (and anyone else who may need them) a visual aid. I will post a follow up to this post on the CN.com forum under the KinkySheaPT section of CurlFriends. I will get the post up on the forum as soon as I can, but you may have to be a bit patient with me as I am in the middle of my final exams. But don't worry, I won't forget about you. 🙂

    To Carla: If you're eating fewer than 53 grams of carbs a day it's quite obvious that you're following a low carb diet. Although it is totally your business if you follow a low carbohydrate diet, I would strongly encourage you to really do some research on the side effects a low carbohydrate diet has on the body. The Moses Taylor Hospital On-Line Library has a great article on the dangers of low carb diets written by Dr. James Kenney. It outlines the 10 big reasons why myself and most physicians and registered dietitians do not recommend or endorse low carb diets or any other fad/crash diet. I highly encourage you or anyone else thinking about following a low carb diet to read it. You can find the article here: http://www.mth.org/LowCarb.html.

    To Anonymous # 2: Harsh comments aside, this recipe is in fact health conscious. In addition to being featured on eatingwell.com, this recipe was also featured in publications by the American Council on Exercise, which has been one of the top health and fitness organizations for the past 25 years. I chose this recipe because it is heart healthy, high in fiber, low calories (less than 250 and that is good for a dessert), low in cholesterol, low in saturated fat, and low sodium. It is also safe for those who require a gluten free diet and it helps to maintain a healthy weight. Bananas are actually have a low glycemic index, meaning that it helps to keep blood sugar stable. If you are following the glycemic index this is actually what you want. The glycemic index can be a useful guide, but be aware that different people have different responses to food and it was originally created to help people with diabetes manage their weight. Protein was also mentioned, again, keep in mind that you only need moderate amounts of protein and although this dessert does have some protein, the majority of your protein should come from meals and snacks you consume throughout your day. In contrast to popular belief adults only need 0.8 grams of protein per kg of body weight. The higher quantities (1.5-2.0 grams per kg of body weight) are usually recommended for adult athletes. And finally, no I am not a personal trainer for a sumo wrestler, though it would make my job much easier and school much cheaper (lol).

    I hope this has helped clear up some confusion. J

  • KinkySheaPT says:

    Hey everyone!

    To Anonymous #1: I can see how pics can be helpful. Some people really like to have visual aids. So what I will do is take a few pics of myself doing these exercises to give you (and anyone else who may need them) a visual aid. I will post a follow up to this post on the CN.com forum under the KinkySheaPT section of CurlFriends. I will get the post up on the forum as soon as I can, but you may have to be a bit patient with me as I am in the middle of my final exams. But don't worry, I won't forget about you. 🙂

    To Carla: If you're eating fewer than 53 grams of carbs a day it's quite obvious that you're following a low carb diet. Although it is totally your business if you follow a low carbohydrate diet, I would strongly encourage you to really do some research on the side effects a low carbohydrate diet has on the body. The Moses Taylor Hospital On-Line Library has a great article on the dangers of low carb diets written by Dr. James Kenney. It outlines the 10 big reasons why myself and most physicians and registered dietitians do not recommend or endorse low carb diets or any other fad/crash diet. I highly encourage you or anyone else thinking about following a low carb diet to read it. You can find the article here: http://www.mth.org/LowCarb.html.

    To Anonymous # 2: Harsh comments aside, this recipe is in fact health conscious. In addition to being featured on eatingwell.com, this recipe was also featured in publications by the American Council on Exercise, which has been one of the top health and fitness organizations for the past 25 years. I chose this recipe because it is heart healthy, high in fiber, low calories (less than 250 and that is good for a dessert), low in cholesterol, low in saturated fat, and low sodium. It is also safe for those who require a gluten free diet and it helps to maintain a healthy weight. I will be sure to make information like this avaliable from now on. Bananas are actually have a low glycemic index, meaning that it helps to keep blood sugar stable. If you are following the glycemic index this is actually what you want. The glycemic index can be a useful guide, but be aware that different people have different responses to food and it was originally created to help people with diabetes manage their weight. Protein was also mentioned, again, keep in mind that you only need moderate amounts of protein and although this dessert does have some protein, the majority of your protein should come from meals and snacks you consume throughout your day. In contrast to popular belief adults only need 0.8 grams of protein per kg of body weight. The higher quantities (1.5-2.0 grams per kg of body weight) are usually recommended for adult athletes. And finally, no I am not a personal trainer for a sumo wrestler, though it would make my job much easier and school much cheaper (lol).

    I hope this has helped clear up some confusion. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    This recipe is crazy. Not even health conscious. Come on girl you need some kind of protein to counter balance the glycemic index of the nanner. How squats do I have to do to burn this off my booty? Are you personal trainer for a sumo wrestler.

  • Carla says:

    53g of carbs!! LOL That's way more than I eat in an entire day!

  • Anonymous says:

    Great Post!!! I'm always looking for new ways to work out….but ummmmmmmmm…I need pics of these exercises…lol.

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